wivern


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wi·vern

 (wī′vərn)
n.
Variant of wyvern.

wivern

(ˈwaɪvən)
n
(Heraldry) a less common spelling of wyvern
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wivern - a fire-breathing dragon used in medieval heraldrywivern - a fire-breathing dragon used in medieval heraldry; had the head of a dragon and the tail of a snake and a body with wings and two legs
dragon, firedrake - a creature of Teutonic mythology; usually represented as breathing fire and having a reptilian body and sometimes wings
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper presents a conically scanning spaceborne Dopplerized 94-GHz radar Earth science mission concept: Wind Velocity Radar Nephoscope (WIVERN).
(2014) provide an excellent review of the need for global wind measurements and argue that the measurement of the three-dimensional global wind field is the final frontier that must be crossed to significantly improve the initial conditions for numerical weather forecasts, and quote WMO as determining that global wind profiles are "essential for operational weather forecasting on all scales and at all latitudes." Assimilation of additional wind observations from the 94-GHz radar on the proposed future Wind Velocity Radar Nephoscope (WIVERN) satellite into weather forecast models should significantly improve weather prediction skill, allowing better focus of mitigation activities with respect to timing, location, and assignment of resources.
One conically scanning WIVERN radar placed in low-Earth orbit could measure the line-of-sight (LOS) component of the horizontal wind and should be able to satisfy the breakthrough requirements in Table 1 for in-cloud winds, except for the 6-h observing cycle that would require multiple satellites.
The WIVERN mission would be complementary to other observing systems providing unique insights into the structure of winds within clouds and precipitating systems.
THE WIVERN CONCEPT AND PREDICTED DOPPLER PERFORMANCE.
Such details are particular helpful, especially in Chapter 3 where the authors give a multifaceted account of Mannix's infamous mid-sea arrest aboard the Baltic for fear his landing in Ireland would lead to further political unrest, drawing not only on Mannix's own accounts, but equally on the reflections of the sailors of HMS Wivern and British authorities.
However, Dundes's application of allomotific analysis to ATU 570, "The Rabbit Herd" (1987) is unmistakably psychoanalytic in tone, as is Holbek's application to ATU 433, "King Wivern" (discussed in Vaz da Silva 2002, 22-24).
We actually construct websites, including the cable company omne.co.uk and Wivern recruitment, and we are in the process of building Tony McCoy's website.
I will briefly substantiate these claims by examining Holbek's analysis of several versions of a particular tale: King Wivern (AT 433B).
Again, the Danish author states, "it makes no difference whether the queen bears a wivern only or a wivern and a normal child" (495).
Thus, in King Wivern, as Holbek and Vaz da Silva call Kong Lindorm (AT 433B), Holbek reads the initial disruption in the story, caused when the queen violates an interdiction about eating certain things to grow pregnant and as a result gives birth to a monster, a wivern prince, as a projection of the prince's own sexual overindulgence.
At the same time, I accept that Holbek's analysis of King Wivern, and of the other tales he takes up in Interpretation of Fairy Tales, are necessarily incomplete, omitting as they do the "secondary connotations" (Simonsen, 1998).