wolf spider


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wolf spider

n.
Any of various spiders of the family Lycosidae that stalk prey on the ground and do not spin webs.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wolf spider

n
(Animals) any spider of the family Lycosidae, which chase their prey to catch it. Also called: hunting spider
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wolf′ spi`der


n.
any of numerous spiders of the family Lycosidae, living in crevices on the ground and hunting prey directly rather than capturing them in a web.
[1600–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wolf spider - ground spider that hunts its prey instead of using a webwolf spider - ground spider that hunts its prey instead of using a web
spider - predatory arachnid with eight legs, two poison fangs, two feelers, and usually two silk-spinning organs at the back end of the body; they spin silk to make cocoons for eggs or traps for prey
family Lycosidae, Lycosidae - wolf spiders
European wolf spider, Lycosa tarentula, tarantula - large southern European spider once thought to be the cause of tarantism (uncontrollable bodily movement)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two different types of spider - the wolf spider and the Malaysian purple femur tarantula - were spotted along the trail.
But that was a wolf spider which was not very big or hairy.
(2009) found that Arctosa fulvolineata, a saltmarsh-inhabiting wolf spider, 'falls into a coma' in order to survive flooding of its habitat.
To escape, the fleeing creatures -- a type of wolf spider -- can produce an individual strand of silk to catch the wind like a parachute.
Samu and Biro (1993) studied the functional response of wolf spider, Pardosa hortensis, under different prey densities.
"It was a huge wolf spider," confirmed Lyndsey Wisegarver, who works with another resident in the building.
"It was a huge wolf spider," Wisegarver told the paper.
(1) Observe: Look closely at the photo of a wolf spider above.
His skin was left crawling after spotting what he thinks was a one-inch wolf spider in a clothes tub.
What a tangled web nature's creatures weave, I just wish I had the wolf spider's eight legs to run away from killer mice.
Some of the animals with their young studied include: sea otter, kangaroo, sloth, opossum, manatee, chimpanzee, common loon, alligators, the wolf spider, emperor penguin, anteater, lion, and finally, human animals as well.