woman of letters


Also found in: Idioms.
Related to woman of letters: man of letters

woman of letters

n. pl. women of letters
A woman who is devoted to literary or scholarly pursuits: "[Eva Le Gallienne] was ... a woman of letters who produced forcefully elegant translations of Ibsen and Hans Christian Andersen" (Margo Jefferson).

wom′an of let′ters


n.
a woman engaged in literary or scholarly pursuits.
[1815–20]
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References in classic literature ?
She held their weakness for lions in good-humoured contempt, but played to them her part of the distinguished woman of letters with decorum.
Mathilde Blind: Late-Victorian Culture and the Woman of Letters
Her careful attention to the differing conditions of the Victorian literary marketplace and to the multitudinous ways that individual women writers operated within those conditions makes Becoming a Woman of Letters a valuable resource for anyone interested in the history of authorship, the development of the idea of the woman writer, or Victorian print culture, and the book makes unique contributions to the history of women and the church.
In 1800 she published De la litterature which consolidated her status as a woman of letters.
The story of de Gournay, a unique Renaissance woman of letters, could constitute a book by itself.
By the 1880's, when A Struggle appeared, the woman of letters was a common figure on the literary scene--from Eliza Lynn Linton .
Forty-one of her letters were included, in English translation, in Selected Writings of an Eighteenth-Century Venetian Woman of Letters, edited by Catherine M.
Dean Sullivan will be wearing a toupee for his role in A Chip in the Sugar as a mother-fixated middle-aged man, and Pauline Daniels is adding years to her age for one of her roles (she appears in both A Woman of Letters and A Cream Cracker Under the Settee).
In the keynote address at a conference for Caribbean Studies, Dona Aida Cartegena Portalatin, "the grand woman of letters in the Dominican Republic" gently chides Alvarez for writing in English.
Gollin's Annie Adams Fields: Woman of Letters (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002).
Although Gournay was well established as a prolific author and a woman of letters in her lifetime, after 1641 her books and essays did not find a publisher until the twentieth century.
Rebecca Grant Sexton's carefully edited compilation of Wilson's correspondence, A Southern Woman of Letters, will usefully supplement the critical investigations of her fiction now possible.