woman suffrage


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Related to woman suffrage: Civil Rights movement

woman suffrage

n.
1. The right of women to vote; exercise of the franchise by women.
2. A movement to promote and secure such rights.

wom′an suf′frage


n.
the right of women to vote.
[1840–50]
wom′an-suf′fra•gist, n.
References in classic literature ?
For, be it known, in my younger days, despite my ardent democracy, I had been opposed to woman suffrage.
In 1909 she produced The Women's Charter of Rights and Liberties for the International Woman Suffrage Alliance.
Although she insisted upon including women's suffrage into any bill proposing black male suffrage, Stone could not bring herself to oppose the Fifteenth Amendment as Stanton and Anthony did; and, when her former friend Anthony formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), she was not invited.
Although many men did not endorse women's suffrage, some saw women's rights as human rights and formed the Men's League for Woman Suffrage.
The Perfect 36" contains interviews that no other book about woman suffrage has.
Edmonton only escaped woman suffrage and the possibility of a petticoat government last night by Ald.
Everything was ready for the woman suffrage movement's biggest splash yet: a parade down Washington's Pennsylvania Avenue on the eve of Woodrow Wilson's 1913 inauguration.
American Woman Suffrage Postcards: A Study and Catalog
Simultaneously, the grassroots activism of Stanton and Anthony's rivals, particularly that of individuals such as Lucy Stone, who led the American Woman Suffrage Association, largely disappeared from historical memory just as their archival remains were heavily excised from the History of Woman Suffrage.
Franzen also rehabilitates Shaw's years as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), arguing that her much belittled tenure actually marked a renaissance of both NAWSA and the right-to-vote movement as a whole.
Their success meant that later generations of suffragists would not only come to honor Seneca Falls as the singular birthplace of woman suffrage but would assume Anthony had been there, although she and Stanton did not meet until 1851.
As the official newspaper for the National Woman Suffrage Association, The Revolution covered the fight and the movement for voters' rights along the way.