woman suffrage


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Related to woman suffrage: Civil Rights movement

woman suffrage

n.
1. The right of women to vote; exercise of the franchise by women.
2. A movement to promote and secure such rights.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wom′an suf′frage


n.
the right of women to vote.
[1840–50]
wom′an-suf′fra•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
For, be it known, in my younger days, despite my ardent democracy, I had been opposed to woman suffrage. In my later and more tolerant years I had been unenthusiastic in my acceptance of it as an inevitable social phenomenon.
Probing for the possible effects of many independent variables on the priority of mothers' pension enactments, we included an assessment of various alternative independent variables referring to woman suffrage. Like Sparks and Walniuk, we hypothesized that many states during the 1910s might have had electoral or legislative climates relatively favorable to women's suffrage even if women were not yet officially enfranchised.
Suffragists faced opposition from southern statesmen who employed flowery Lost Cause rhetoric about manhood, Appomattox, and "surrender." But they also found themselves under attack by female stalwarts such as Mildred Rutherford, president of her state's United Daughters of the Confederacy, who supported the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage:
Catt organized the lowa Woman Suffrage Association, founded the International Woman Suffrage Association, and reorganized the National American Woman Suffrage Association in order to strengthen its political effectiveness.
Her writings deal mainly with social and political problems: slavery, wrongs suffered by women and children, evils in education, woman suffrage. Her titles include An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism (1837), The Evils Suffered by American Women and .
With Elizabeth Cady Stanton, she organized the National Woman Suffrage Association (1869), and in 1890 this group merged with another to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association, of which Anthony was president (1892 - 1900).
The Teaching with Documents area of the National Archives contains educational resources focused on Woman Suffrage and the 19th Amendment <https://bit.
Fifteen chapters are: what Alice Paul did for suffrage between 1912 and 1920; what the suffragistsAE victory meant; how the vote was won; where Paul fits into suffrage history; imagination, creativity and nonviolence; when the right to vote is not the right to vote; equal suffrage and equal rights; the unfinished business of the Civil War; intended consequences; woman suffrage and civil rights; the long-term influence of PaulAEs campaign; civil rights cross-pollination; the inequalities of inequalities; woman suffrage and the prioritization of inequalities; neglected civil rights sites in Washington, D.C.
The Concise History of Woman Suffrage: Selections From History of Woman Suffrage.
According to historian Andrea Kerr Moore, the American Woman Suffrage Association "sent out almost 216,000 leaflets from its Boston headquarters" in one year.
Winning The Vote: The Triumph Of The American Woman Suffrage Movement by Robert Cooney in association with the National Women's History Project is a comprehensive, 496-page history of the struggle for American women to have the right to vote in local, state, and national political elections.
There's also an excerpt from Francis Parkman's booklet, Some of the Reasons Against Woman Suffrage, to represent counter-arguments, and Sojourner Truth's "A'n't I a Woman" speech.