womanliness


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Related to womanliness: femininity

wom·an·ly

 (wo͝om′ən-lē)
adj. wom·an·li·er, wom·an·li·est
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of women, often in showing qualities traditionally attributed to women: "Feminism had ... held out a promise that there would be some precincts of womanly life that were not all about men" (Maureen Dowd).
2. Fully developed as a woman, as in having a curvaceous figure: "I watch the way she sleeps, rolled onto her side, too womanly for the slender child's bed" (Alexandra Fuller).

wom′an·li·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.womanliness - the trait of being womanly; having the characteristics of an adult female
femininity, muliebrity - the trait of behaving in ways considered typical for women

womanliness

noun
The quality or condition of being feminine:
Translations
نِسَوِيَّه، أنثويَّه
kvindelighed
kvenleiki
kadınsı davranış

womanliness

[ˈwʊmənlɪnɪs] Nfeminidad f

womanliness

nWeiblichkeit f

womanliness

[ˈwʊmənlɪnɪs] nfemminilità

woman

(ˈwumən) plural women (ˈwimin) noun
1. an adult human female. His sisters are both grown women now; (also adjective) a woman doctor; women doctors.
2. a female domestic daily helper. We have a woman who comes in to do the cleaning.
-woman sometimes used instead of -man when the person performing an activity is a woman, as in chairwoman
ˈwomanhood noun
the state of being a woman. She will reach womanhood in a few years' time.
ˈwomankind, womenkind (ˈwimin-) nouns
women generally.
ˈwomanly adjective
(showing qualities) natural or suitable to a woman. a womanly figure; womanly charm.
ˈwomanliness noun
ˈwomenfolk (ˈwimin-) noun plural
female people, especially female relatives.
References in classic literature ?
It was a feebler relief, a feebler triumph she felt now, but the great dark eyes and the sweet lips were as beautiful as ever, perhaps more beautiful, for there was a more luxuriant womanliness about Hetty of late.
As she walked along today, for all her bouncing handsome womanliness, you could sometimes see her twelfth year in her cheeks, or her ninth sparkling from her eyes; and even her fifth would flit over the curves of her mouth now and then.
She saw her face as the glass reflected it, but she did not see the changing play of expression which gave it its charm--the infinite pity, the sympathy, the sweet womanliness which drew towards her all who were in doubt and in trouble, even as poor slow-moving Charles Westmacott had been drawn to her that night.
After all, why should she keep him waiting when he needed her so much, she had thought tenderly, all the sweet womanliness in her astir with yearnings to lift the cloud of loneliness from his life.
I should n't have thought you 'd mind things like that," said Fanny, beginning to understand that there may be a good deal of womanliness even in a little girl.
And Denis had laughed at her waywardness, for perhaps he was inwardly convinced of the womanliness of artifice, and was guiltily on holiday in a realm of anarchy, and said, Oh how lovely you are.
This also applies to women warriors: displaying their heroic athleticism in violent combat with male opponents, they are typically demonised for lacking womanliness.
It's one of the things that I love about the fact that she is a super heroine - is that her approach to everything has a womanliness about it.
The assemblymen babbled that the sweet womanliness of the Filipina should be insulated from political discord to preserve the sweetness of the home.
In what follows, I will analyze The House of Mirth in relation to these concepts, exploring the themes of "womanliness", marriage, death and the extent to which the depiction of Lily conforms to and/or challenges the image of the New American Woman.
They were both part of a masquerade--to use the term that Joan Riviere coined in her often quoted 1929 text "Womanliness as a Masquerade"--' since the two images belonged to a fluid concept of gender which the "New Woman" timidly codified at the turn of the century and which was later developed in Virginia Woolf's Orlando (1928).