wonders


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won·der

 (wŭn′dər)
n.
1.
a. The emotion aroused by something awe-inspiring, astounding, or surprising: gazed with wonder at the northern lights.
b. The quality that arouses such emotion: "Her long fair hair was girlish: and girlish, and touched with the wonder of mortal beauty, her face" (James Joyce).
2.
a. One that arouses awe, astonishment, surprise, or admiration; a marvel: Given all his unhealthy habits, it's a wonder he's lived this long. She was a wonder in that movie.
b. often Wonder A monumental human creation regarded with awe, especially one of seven monuments of the ancient world that appeared on various lists of late antiquity.
3.
a. An extraordinary or remarkable act or achievement: That teacher has worked wonders with these students.
b. An event inexplicable by the laws of nature; a miracle.
v. won·dered, won·der·ing, won·ders
v.intr.
1. To have a feeling of awe, astonishment, surprise, or admiration: We wondered at the ease with which she settled into her new job.
2. To be filled with curiosity or doubt: I could only wonder after hearing his excuse. I wondered about his late-night comings and goings.
v.tr.
To feel curiosity or be in doubt about: I wondered what kind of costume she would wear. I wondered why I said that.
adj.
Remarkable or extraordinary, especially in being beneficial: considers quinoa a wonder grain.
Idioms:
do wonders
To have a beneficial effect: This tonic will do wonders for you.
for a wonder
As a cause for surprise; surprisingly.

[Middle English, from Old English wundor.]

won′der·er n.
Synonyms: wonder, marvel, miracle, phenomenon
These nouns denote one that evokes amazement or admiration: saw the wonders of Paris; a marvel of modern technology; a miracle of culinary art; a phenomenon of medical science.
References in classic literature ?
No fear of him not starting for the land of wonders."
Swinging through the trees with great speed, he reached the point only a moment after the ship had passed out of the harbor, so that he obtained an excellent view of the wonders of this strange, floating house.
Happy he who, like Ulysses, has made an adventurous voyage; and there is no such sea for adventurous voyages as the Mediterranean - the inland sea which the ancients looked upon as so vast and so full of wonders. And, indeed, it was terrible and wonderful; for it is we alone who, swayed by the audacity of our minds and the tremors of our hearts, are the sole artisans of all the wonder and romance of the world.
What I now affirm is, that I have a right to speak of these seas, under which, in less than ten months, I have crossed 20,000 leagues in that submarine tour of the world, which has revealed so many wonders.
But that was not the wonder of wonders; I reserve this distinction for quite another circumstance: the circumstance that dread had unmistakably quitted me and that there was nothing in me there that didn't meet and measure him.
Pinocchio finds the Fox and the Cat again, and goes with them to sow the gold pieces in the Field of Wonders
"Every conversation of the cottagers now opened new wonders to me.
Dickon pushed the chair slowly round and round the garden, stopping every other moment to let him look at wonders springing out of the earth or trailing down from trees.
When the Frost-Spirits told their King, he greatly wondered and often stole to look at the sunny little room where friends and enemies worked peacefully together.
Early on the following day the whole town was on its feet, and everyone wondered how and where the stranger would build the wonderful palace.
We wondered how such a solid mass of masonry could be affected even by an earthquake, and could not understand what agency had made Banias a ruin; but we found the destroyer, after a while, and then our wonder was increased tenfold.
Do you know, Miss Summerson, I almost wonder that YOU never turned your thoughts to Africa."