wondred

wondred

(ˈwʌndəd)
adj
causing wonder; amazing
References in periodicals archive ?
37 (James Madison), supra note 1, at 262 ("When the Almighty himself condescends to address mankind in their own language, his meaning, luminous as it must be, is rendered dim and doubtful by the cloudy medium through which it is communicated."), with LOCKE, supra note 67, at 490 ("Nor is it to be wondred, that the Will of GOD, when cloathed in words, should be liable to that doubt and uncertainty, which unavoidably attends that sort of Conveyance ....").
in the midst of my jollity a Cloud comes over me, death takes away my father before I was seven years old, and now he forgets me at his death, that was his delight a little before; and making his last Will, he leaves a Portion to all his children by Name, and to many of his kindred, some a farre off, for he did abound in riches; but I was not so much as mentioned in his Will, neither any thing left for mee, so that I came soon to know the folly of vaine confidence in men; and now my brethren who afore envied me began to glory over mee, saying, I had nothing to do among them, and what was I but a begger: and many wondred at it, and pitied me, saying, had my Father forgot me his darling?
For which merveille wondred many a man, And seyden, whan they were in privetee, "Wol nat oure lord yet leve his vanytee?
Mahomet, although he was by nature of a fierce and cruell disposition, wondred to see so strange a spectacle of extreame crueltie: yet said no more but that Wladus knew how to haue his subjects at commaund.
And eek men broghte hym out of his contree, From yeer to yeer, ful pryvely his rente; But honestly and slyly he it spente, That no man wondred how that he it hadde.
In canto 12, readers witness Guyon applying his acquired knowledge: Much wondred Guyon at the faire aspect Of that sweet place, yet suffred no delight To sincke into his sence, nor mind affect, But passed forth, and lookt still forward right, Bridling his will, and maistering his might.
They wondred all, and merveiled, saying among themselfes; behold, are not al these, which speake, of Galile?
Ever wondred how many Tamsins it takes to make a total cock-up?
Shakespeare': VVEE wondred (Shakespeare) that thou went'st so soone From the Worlds-Stage, to the Graues-Tyring-roome.
Both descriptions are recalled in Comes' Mythologiae,(14) and similar accounts of the island's fertility are to be found in the most famous Renaissance dictionaries: Cooper, for instance, writes that 'the fertilitie of this yle in all grayne, beautie of meadowes, delicateness of waters colde and hote, mountaynes and caves miraculous, and other thinges there exceedinge notable many authours have written and wondred at both Greekes and Latines'.(15) Ripa's representation of Sicilia in his Iconologia(16) shows a beautiful woman holding flowers with a sheaf of corn on one side and on the other the marvellous cane from which sugar may be extracted: she reminds one of his figures of Ceres, Abundance, and the Golden Age.
Againe, I may perhaps be wondred at for writing in this kinde, considering there are so many excellent bookes, whose least note is worth all my meditations.
The past is likened to the cliffs on the shore, which grow ever harder to see the further away we sail on the sea of time; until finally, those cliffs are "out of kenning quite": "So, of the Ages past; / Those things that in their Age much to be wondred were, / Still as wing-footed Time them farther off doth beare, / Doe lessen every howre." Dee has shifted his discussion quite suddenly, turning a defense of Geoffrey into a lament about the inaccessibility of the past; an argument for continuity, it seems, melts into a concession to the fact of discontinuity.