wonky

(redirected from wonkier)
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won·ky

 (wŏng′kē)
adj. won·ki·er, won·ki·est Chiefly British
1. Shaky or unsteady: a wonky table.
2. Out of alignment; crooked: "The door itself looked wonky somehow, not quite square with the building" (Steve Augarde).
3. Not functioning properly or normally: wonky digestion; a wonky phone connection.
4. Mentally unbalanced; crazy.

[Probably alteration of dialectal wanky, alteration of wankle, from Middle English wankel, from Old English wancol, unsteady.]

wonky

(ˈwɒŋkɪ)
adj, -kier or -kiest
1. shaky or unsteady
2. not in correct alignment; askew
3. liable to break down or develop a fault
[C20: variant of dialect wanky, from Old English wancol]

won•ky

(ˈwɒŋ ki)

adj. -ki•er, -ki•est.
Brit. Informal.
a. shaky; unsteady.
b. unreliable.
[1920–25; perhaps variant of dial. wanky=wank(le) (Middle English wankel, Old English wancol]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wonky - turned or twisted toward one sidewonky - turned or twisted toward one side; "a...youth with a gorgeous red necktie all awry"- G.K.Chesterton; "his wig was, as the British say, skew-whiff"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
2.wonky - inclined to shake as from weakness or defect; "a rickety table"; "a wobbly chair with shaky legs"; "the ladder felt a little wobbly"; "the bridge still stands though one of the arches is wonky"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"

wonky

adjective
1. askew, squint (informal), awry, out of alignment, skewwhiff (Brit. informal) The wheels of the trolley kept going wonky.
2. shaky, weak, wobbly, unsteady, infirm He's got a wonky knee. shaky
Translations

wonky

[ˈwɒŋkɪ] ADJ (wonkier (compar) (wonkiest (superl))) (Brit)
1. (= wobbly) [chair, table] → cojo, que se tambalea
2. (= crooked) → torcido, chueco (LAm)
3. (= broken down) → estropeado, descompuesto (esp Mex)
to go wonky [car, machine] → estropearse; [TV picture] → descomponerse

wonky

[ˈwɒŋki] adj (British) [chair, trolley, wheels] → branlant(e); [knees] → flageolant(e)

wonky

adj (+er) (Brit inf) chair, marriage, grammarwackelig; nosekrumm, schief; machinenicht (ganz) in Ordnung; sense of judgement etcnicht ganz richtig, aus dem Lot; your hat’s a bit/your collar’s all wonkydein Hut/dein Kragen sitzt ganz schief

wonky

[ˈwɒŋkɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (Brit) (fam) (chair, table) → traballante
to go wonky (TV picture, machine) → fare i capricci
References in periodicals archive ?
This sort of investment in sector infrastructure is one the wonkier ideas from Bridgespan's offices, Bielak conceded, but it has been well-received by advisory board members and interviewees alike.
A vigorous, ambitious Switzerland fizzed at the WC, and though their new ranking of 9th looks wonky, 13/8 an away win looks wonkier.
The game is putting more money into the legal profession than anywhere else while Scottish football's gone wonkier than a Rory McIlroy drive.
It's been a long way coming for the activists, who were originally a wonkier set within the 15M movement fighting to reform their country's strict foreclosure law.
Its electorate is likely to be both younger and wonkier than the group of Americans who share Ackerman's political beliefs.