wonky


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won·ky

 (wŏng′kē)
adj. won·ki·er, won·ki·est Chiefly British
1. Shaky or unsteady: a wonky table.
2. Out of alignment; crooked: "The door itself looked wonky somehow, not quite square with the building" (Steve Augarde).
3. Not functioning properly or normally: wonky digestion; a wonky phone connection.
4. Mentally unbalanced; crazy.

[Probably alteration of dialectal wanky, alteration of wankle, from Middle English wankel, from Old English wancol, unsteady.]

wonky

(ˈwɒŋkɪ)
adj, -kier or -kiest
1. shaky or unsteady
2. not in correct alignment; askew
3. liable to break down or develop a fault
[C20: variant of dialect wanky, from Old English wancol]

won•ky

(ˈwɒŋ ki)

adj. -ki•er, -ki•est.
Brit. Informal.
a. shaky; unsteady.
b. unreliable.
[1920–25; perhaps variant of dial. wanky=wank(le) (Middle English wankel, Old English wancol]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wonky - turned or twisted toward one sidewonky - turned or twisted toward one side; "a...youth with a gorgeous red necktie all awry"- G.K.Chesterton; "his wig was, as the British say, skew-whiff"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
2.wonky - inclined to shake as from weakness or defect; "a rickety table"; "a wobbly chair with shaky legs"; "the ladder felt a little wobbly"; "the bridge still stands though one of the arches is wonky"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"

wonky

adjective
1. askew, squint (informal), awry, out of alignment, skewwhiff (Brit. informal) The wheels of the trolley kept going wonky.
2. shaky, weak, wobbly, unsteady, infirm He's got a wonky knee. shaky
Translations

wonky

[ˈwɒŋkɪ] ADJ (wonkier (compar) (wonkiest (superl))) (Brit)
1. (= wobbly) [chair, table] → cojo, que se tambalea
2. (= crooked) → torcido, chueco (LAm)
3. (= broken down) → estropeado, descompuesto (esp Mex)
to go wonky [car, machine] → estropearse; [TV picture] → descomponerse

wonky

[ˈwɒŋki] adj (British) [chair, trolley, wheels] → branlant(e); [knees] → flageolant(e)

wonky

adj (+er) (Brit inf) chair, marriage, grammarwackelig; nosekrumm, schief; machinenicht (ganz) in Ordnung; sense of judgement etcnicht ganz richtig, aus dem Lot; your hat’s a bit/your collar’s all wonkydein Hut/dein Kragen sitzt ganz schief

wonky

[ˈwɒŋkɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (Brit) (fam) (chair, table) → traballante
to go wonky (TV picture, machine) → fare i capricci
References in periodicals archive ?
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"How many Indesit/Hotpoint engineers does it take to replace a wonky cooker knob covered by an expensive service contract?" Answer: "Nobody knows because it hasn't happened yet."