woodcock

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wood·cock

 (wo͝od′kŏk′)
n. pl. woodcock or wood·cocks
Any of several woodland birds of the genus Scolopax found in Eurasia, Africa, and North America, having brownish plumage, short legs, and a long bill. The woodcocks are in the same family as the sandpipers and other shorebirds.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

woodcock

(ˈwʊdˌkɒk)
n
1. (Animals) an Old World game bird, Scolopax rusticola, resembling the snipe but larger and having shorter legs and neck: family Scolopacidae (sandpipers, etc), order Charadriiformes
2. (Animals) a related North American bird, Philohela minor
3. obsolete a simpleton
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wood•cock

(ˈwʊdˌkɒk)

n., pl. -cocks, (esp. collectively) -cock for 1,2.
either of two plump, short-legged woodland birds of the sandpiper family, a North American species Scolopax minor and a larger Eurasian species S. rusticola, having variegated brown plumage.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woodcock - game bird of the sandpiper family that resembles a snipewoodcock - game bird of the sandpiper family that resembles a snipe
limicoline bird, shore bird, shorebird - any of numerous wading birds that frequent mostly seashores and estuaries
Eurasian woodcock, Scolopax rusticola - short-legged long-billed migratory Old World woodcock
American woodcock, Philohela minor, woodcock snipe - small long-billed woodcock; prized as a game bird
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

woodcock

noun
Related words
collective noun fall
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

woodcock

[ˈwʊdkɒk] Nchocha f perdiz
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

woodcock

[ˈwʊdkɒk] [woodcock] (pl) nbécasse f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

woodcock

[ˈwʊdˌkɒk] nbeccaccia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
During their games, their bounds, while rivalling each other in beauty, brightness, and velocity, I distinguished the green labre; the banded mullet, marked by a double line of black; the round-tailed goby, of a white colour, with violet spots on the back; the Japanese scombrus, a beautiful mackerel of these seas, with a blue body and silvery head; the brilliant azurors, whose name alone defies description; some banded spares, with variegated fins of blue and yellow; the woodcocks of the seas, some specimens of which attain a yard in length; Japanese salamanders, spider lampreys, serpents six feet long, with eyes small and lively, and a huge mouth bristling with teeth; with many other species.
John, bringing home winged game, another hares or rabbits, and another hunting on marshy ground and almost nightly catching woodcocks or snipes.
Woodcock. Hot wheat-bread, Southern Canvasback-duck, from style.
For them the earliest salmon is caught in our eastern rivers, and the shy woodcock stains the dry leaves with his blood in his remotest haunts, and the turtle comes from the far Pacific Islands to be gobbled up in soup.
But we are more like to hawk at the Spanish woodcock than at the French heron, though certes it is rumored that Du Guesclin with all the best lances of France have taken service under the lions and towers of Castile.
Thither, too, the woodcock led her brood, to probe the mud for worms, flying but a foot above them down the bank, while they ran in a troop beneath; but at last, spying me, she would leave her young and circle round and round me, nearer and nearer till within four or five feet, pretending broken wings and legs, to attract my attention, and get off her young, who would already have taken up their march, with faint, wiry peep, single file through the swamp, as she directed.
Turtle, salmon, tautog, woodcock, boiled turkey, South-Down mutton, pig, roast-beef, have vanished, or exist only in fragments, with lukewarm potatoes, and gravies crusted over with cold fat.
At last extinguishing the fire, he took the idol up very unceremoniously, and bagged it again in his grego pocket as carelessly as if he were a sportsman bagging a dead woodcock. All these queer proceedings increased my uncomfortableness, and seeing him now exhibiting strong symptoms of concluding his business operations, and jumping into bed with me, I thought it was high time, now or never, before the light was put out, to break the spell into which I had so long been bound.
Woodcocks are large bulky wading birds with long bills which are not particularly rare, but are seen infrequently because they are largely nocturnal.
During the day, Woodcocks roost in nearby woodland, coming onto these wet pastures after dark to forage for worms.
Scientists are hoping to find out if the woodcocks return to the sites where they were first tagged or opt to see out the winter elsewhere in the UK.
Eleven woodcocks are being followed as part of the study from the Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust.