woodland vole


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woodland vole

n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Other mammals that might be expected are the southern flying squirrel Glaucomys volans, the woodland vole Microtus pinetorum, Norway rat Rattus norvegicus, the river otter Lontra canadensis, and the badger Taxidea taxus.
Similarly, the black and white warbler and woodland vole are deciduous forest affiliates represented by disjunct populations in the study area and adjacent Edwards Plateau.
At this time such eastern regional elements as the sugar maple and woodland vole probably ranged across the area, which lacked continuous tallgrass prairie and evergreen woodland (Martin and Harrell, 1957; Blair, 1958).
Winter trappability was higher than in other seasons, even in the burrowing woodland vole.
Goertz (1971) presented a compelling explanation for the brief surge in woodland vole densities: the extirpation of a local cotton rat population due to extreme winter weather enabled woodland voles to flourish for a year or more.
The prairie vole, woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) did not contain any cicada remains in their stomachs.
Prairie and woodland voles are primarily herbivorous (Mumtbrd & Whitaker 1982) and did not feed on cicadas during this study.
Species not previously collected in Newton County were the least shrew (Cryptotis parva), the woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus).
Lyon reported 22 species: opossum, short-tailed shrew, eastern mole, eastern red bat, eastern cottontail, eastern chipmunk, woodchuck, thirteen-lined ground squirrel, fox squirrel, red squirrel, prairie deer mouse, white-footed mouse, prairie vole, woodland vole, muskrat, Norway rat, house mouse, red fox, raccoon, long-tailed weasel, mink and striped skunk.
These factors were important for woodland voles, Microtus pinetorum (Fisher and Anthony, 1980; Rhodes and Richmond, 1985).
They are also responsible for the decline in woodland voles,mice and shrews.