woodlot


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wood·lot

or wood lot  (wo͝od′lŏt′)
n.
A usually private area used for growing trees, especially for building material or fuel.

woodlot

(ˈwʊdˌlɒt)
n
(Forestry) an area restricted to the growing of trees. Also called (esp Canadian): bush lot
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References in classic literature ?
On his left were a stone wall and a gate, the boundary of a woodlot, beyond which lay an orchard, farther still, a mowing field, and last of all, a house.
How many a poor immortal soul have I met well-nigh crushed and smothered under its load, creeping down the road of life, pushing before it a barn seventy-five feet by forty, its Augean stables never cleansed, and one hundred acres of land, tillage, mowing, pasture, and woodlot! The portionless, who struggle with no such unnecessary inherited encumbrances, find it labor enough to subdue and cultivate a few cubic feet of flesh.
"There are two ways of going at a forest: you can destroy it or you can harvest it sustainably." These are the first words Merv Wilkinson utters to the hundreds of students, naturalists, scientists and others who annually tour his 136-acre woodlot near Nanaimo on Vancouver Island.
For three years I chased the majestic creature with my camera, never quite getting close enough to take a good picture, but often catching a glimpse of it as it flew away to another woodlot.
COUNTRYSIDE: Susan Gateley's article on deer browse in the woodlot was of special interest (Jan/Feb 2014).
Often overlooked and thought of only in timber terms, there are multiple ways to create income from a small woodlot beyond selling saw logs.
These are often manageable, but even so, know that your woodlot will be different going forward.
The Scottish Woodlot Association - set up to facilitate affordable access to woodland for woodsmen - is working with the Borders Forest Trust at Moffat's Corehead Farm.
'The woodlot will be raised over an area of 20016 hectors.
A small woodlot hugged the back edge of the property, possibly offering very limited deer potential.
At the Legon site, the studied land-use systems were woodlot (Leucaena leucocephala), cultivated maize (Zea mays) field, and a natural forest stand.