woodwose


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woodwose

(ˈwʊdˌwəʊz)
n
a hairy wildman of the woods
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Not long after Turin claims the Helm of Hador at the age of eighteen and starts fighting orcs alongside the elves of Doriath, he becomes embroiled in a conflict with the king's advisor Saeros, which in part hinges on Saeros giving him the mocking name Woodwose, or wild man of the woods (CoH 88).
I want to make Richmond a very fine museum for English silver, and the new collection will really do it.' With typical insight, she has included in her latest gift a rare 15th-century woodwose spoon, a modest luxury which recalls the long English love affair with silver; in fact this small object may well speak to visitors more eloquently than many of the grander pieces.
Also known as the woodwose, wooser, or "wild man of the woods," it was conspicuous in folklore between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries and holds a prominent place in later medieval European artwork and literature.
There is something of the untamed mythic creatures of the greenwood about her, something of the hamadryad or the woodwose or 'of faery damsels met in forest wide/By Knights of Logres, or of Lyonesse'.
"Woose" looks like a re-spelling (possibly a typo?) for "wose," a term going back to Old English" "wasa," known in the compound "wuduwasa," "woodwose," meaning a wild man-like creature living in the woods (presumably something like a faun, satyr, sasquatch, or yeti).
That heir was the Wild Man, known in British folklore as the Woodwose or the Green Man (once hero of many inn-signs).