wooingly

wooingly

(ˈwuːɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a wooing manner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Shavelson wooingly showcases the "prominence" of the CLA, framing it within the context of reliability and validity.
What little sense of freshness, greenness, and fertility the play affords in an otherwise stiflingly claustrophobic atmosphere emerges in Banquo's ironic description of Inverness as a place where "heaven's breath / Smells wooingly" (1.6.5-6) (25) and also perhaps in the march of Birnam Wood to Dunsinane, which some have regarded as the symbolic re-greening of Scotland.
This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve By his loved mansionry that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here.
Previously, the Macbeth castle was depicted as an idyllic sight: "This castle has a pleasant seat; the air / Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself / Unto our gentle senses" (Duncan, 1.6.1-3) or "This guest of summer, / The templehaunting martlet, does approve, / By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath / Smells wooingly here" (Banquo, 1.6.3-6); but after the murder it turns immediately into the castle of horrors, into Hell itself.