wootz


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wootz

 (wo͞ots)
n.
A hard, high-carbon steel developed in India around 300 bc, used in the production of Damascus steel.

[Probably from a misreading of an English transcription of Kannada ukku, urku, steel; akin to Tamil uruku, to melt and urukku, melted thing, steel.]

wootz

(wuːts)
n
(Metallurgy) a type of crucible steel developed in India
References in periodicals archive ?
Though supplier selection has been a research focus for nearly a half-century (e.g., Agarwal, Sahai, Mishra, Bag, & Singh, 2011; Dickson, 1966; Edwards, 1967; Hakansson & Wootz, 1975; Koufteros, Vickery, & Droge, 2012), only more recently have scholars begun to link CSR postulates and initiatives to supply management activities (e.g., Carter, 2005; Carter & Easton, 201 I; Carter & Jennings, 2002a, b, 2004; Maloni & Brown, 2006; Sarkis, Zhu, & Lai, 2011; Walker & Jones, 2012).
This is further supported by the fact that, with the exception of a few articles based on experiments (e.g., Hakansson and Wootz 1975; Insch and Miller 2005; White and Cundiff 1978), the most common method of controlling variables was on an ex-post facto basis (found in 97.2% of empirical articles), rather than by experimental designs.
It was created from wootz steel, which was developed in India around 300 BC, and further refined by Middle Eastern swordsmiths.
Research carried out to date devotes most of its attention precisely to the vertical network relationships between customers and suppliers within supply chain (see: Hakansson, Johanson and Wootz, 1976, p.
The making of hand-forged Damascus steel originated from techniques used in 300100 BC India and Sri Lanka, where it was referred to as Wootz steel.
The area is renowned for the specialised production of crucible steel, sometimes called wootz, a material used in the manufacture of the fabled swords of Damascus.
It is known that Wootz steel, from which Damascus steel was derived (Verhoeven et al.
Around 300 B.C., metal workers in south India develop crucible steel making, which produces "wootz" steel.
Little wonder some of the details of the Mahabharata have spilled over into the epic next door, along with a veritable arsenal--a thousand years ago, proliferation worries focused on wootz, the exotic weapons-grade steel of indomitable temper that poured out of India into the arras bazaar of Damascus.
Hankansson and Wootz (1979) developed a communication model that examined buyer/seller expectations.
2) [acute{s}]aikya is an allomorph of saikya, which is an adjective based on the noun seka ("pour, cast") from the root [surd]sic, "pour, cast (molten metal)"; it is an adjective meaning "metal that has been fused, metal ready for casting, (previously) molten metal." The word saikya/[acute{s}]aikya must refer to India's ancient steel, famous in the classical Mediterranean world, made by a process essentially the same as that of the famous crucible-fused wootz of South India, long the basic steel of "damascene" blades.
In l982, he rediscovered the process for casting Wootz, a premier steel made in ancient India that gained renown in Europe as Damascus steel.