word blindness


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word blindness

n.
See alexia.

word′-blind′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

word blindness

n
(Pathology) the nontechnical name for alexia, dyslexia
ˈword-ˌblind adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•lex•i•a

(əˈlɛk si ə)

n.
a neurologic disorder marked by loss of the ability to understand written or printed language, usu. resulting from a brain lesion or a congenital defect. Also called word blindness.
[1875–80; a-6 + Greek léx(is) speech (lég(ein) to speak + -sis -sis) + -ia]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.word blindness - inability to perceive written wordsword blindness - inability to perceive written words
aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

word blindness

ndislessia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
| WHAT...condition is also called word blindness? | WHERE...was the official residence of the Northern Ireland prime minister until 1972?
His strokes left him with word blindness - and he is speaking out to warn others addicted to the buzz from the seemingly innocent drinks whose sales continue to rise.
During the interview with Tony, it started to dawn on me that I appear to have the same problems, so I told him that when I receive my panto script, I struggle with word blindness and trying to take the words in, needing complete concentration and no distractions whatsoever.
suffering from word blindness throughout the area, including Holmfirth and Dewsbury.
Times have thankfully moved on from the first descriptions of 'word blindness' more than a century ago, but as Dr Rack notes: "There are large numbers of adults whose difficulties were not picked up at school; some only become aware of their own dyslexia when their children's difficulties are identified."
Until the nature of "word blindness" was recognized, generation after generation of children who struggled to read and write were condemned as lazy or stupid or both.
The 40-year-old was diagnosed with alexia without agraphia, also known as "word blindness", in which a patient loses the ability to read, but can still write and understand the spoken word.
In 1878 the German neurologist Adolph Kussmaul first coined the term "word blindness" to describe his findings of patients who could not read and regularly used words in the wrong order.
We learn of Fefa's struggles with "word blindness" (dyslexia?) through her words and poems.
This is an inaccuracy, as she was actually unable to speak at the age of five because of her word blindness.