word order


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word order

n.
The linear arrangement of words in a sentence, clause, or phrase.

word order

n
(Linguistics) the arrangement of words in a phrase, clause, or sentence. In many languages, including English, word order plays an important part in determining meanings expressed in other languages by inflections

word′ or`der


n.
the way in which words are arranged in sequence in a sentence or smaller construction.
[1890–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.word order - the order of words in a textword order - the order of words in a text  
text, textual matter - the words of something written; "there were more than a thousand words of text"; "they handed out the printed text of the mayor's speech"; "he wants to reconstruct the original text"
ordering, ordination, order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
Translations
ordre des mots

word order

nordine m delle parole
References in periodicals archive ?
Supported by the Greek word order, these verses read that Paul is rejoicing exceedingly, night and day, for the faith of the Thessalonians and, in that state, prays to see them in order to continue to build them up.
Conversely, word order often means no words at all, sentence elements dropped because we speak so quickly or wish to eliminate redundancy.
James Wyatt Cook's verse translation of all 366 poems is therefore a substantial benefit both to students who may wish to find in Petrarch something more than formulas of compliment and amatory pain and to teachers and critics who may wish to gauge how much of the original can be glimpsed through the rhythms, diction, and word order of a different language and a partially different poetic tonality.
Grammatical constraints for English include the basic word order of subject-verb-object in a sentence and the necessity for all words in a sentence to contribute to its meaning.
In Spanish literature, an esoteric style of writing that attempted to elevate poetic language and themes by re-Latinizing them, using classical allusions, vocabulary, syntax, and word order.
In sections on generating and creating narratives; language and narrative; and cognition, culture, and narrative, they consider such topics as designing a socially open narrative generation system, applying digital storytelling to business planning, word order flexibility in Japanese novels: a dynamic syntax perspective, assessing the appeal power of narrative performance by using eyeblink synchronization among the audience, and kabuki as multiple narrative structures.
They cover the Basque language today, dialects, external sources for historical research, phonetics and phonology, root structure and the reconstruction of proto-Basque, noun morphology, demonstratives and personal pronouns, finite and non-finite verbal morphology, and word order.
One paper concerns Berber word order, while the others, on Egyptian or Egyptian and Berber, offer important comparisons with Semitic.
This is the first time anyone has found a link between intonation and word order in questions, and it could also help explain how babies learn to speak.
The volume under review is a collection of seven papers devoted to a number of issues concerning the structure of Old English (henceforth OE) clauses, with special emphasis on word order.
What is to be assumed about the relation between language-specific word order and focus identification?