word stress


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word stress

Word stress, also called lexical stress, is the emphasis a speaker places on a specific syllable in a multi-syllable word.
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word stress

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) the stress accent on the syllables of individual words either in a sentence or in isolation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

word′ stress`


n.
the pattern of stress given to an individual word, esp. when said in isolation.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.word stress - the distribution of stresses within a polysyllabic wordword stress - the distribution of stresses within a polysyllabic word
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Athough the songs project the emotional changes in the poetry, Bolcom recommends that these songs be performed "with great restraint and nuance, so that the balance between art and emotion becomes the fulcrum and focus of the song." These songs require intelligent performers who understand Italian poetry and word stress, which may be the chief difficulty for the singer.
This paper presents an overview of research on Estonian speech prosody from the 17th century to the beginning of the 19th century, focusing on the discovery of three levels of word stress and quantity.
Word stress is honored while the melodic gestures paint the picture and provide quiet motion.
Ariste had treated separately from the usual main and secondary word stress. Tiit-Rein Viitso (1975), when reviewing the thesis by M.
"Quand je te vois, seule, assise ..." reveals the poet's timidity in the face of his beloved's brilliant beauty: "Only my sighs, only my sad face speak for me; and such passion gives sufficient evidence of my love." Set in slow 4/4 meter, the vocal line flows smoothly and plaintively (and with appropriate agogic word stress for the French text) above a simple piano figuration that creates the mood of watching from afar.
The vocal line carries the text with a smooth flow of melody whose rhythms fit the word stress.
The vocal lines have variety and interest, and the rhythmic setting reflects word stress and phrasing in many instances.
The rhythmic structure follows word stress and is often quite interesting.
The vocal lines are melodic and wide ranging, the text responding to word stress within the confines of the melodic structure.
The texts are declaimed, sometimes melodically, sometimes in faster rhythms on repeated or adjacent pitches to accommodate word stress, over the music that sometimes underlies, sometimes illustrates, and always creates the mood for the text.
A pulsing syncopated piano bass line, rather like a heartbeat, sets the scene for "I lie in this coffin the way I would lie in a suit made of wood, a bark tossed on treacherous water, a cradle, an ark." The rhythms of the vocal line fit the word stress of the text as the notes weave a rising melody in which the poet calls out to the spirit of his sister.
French is a language that is constantly neutralizing and regrouping word stress patterns.