word-hoard


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word-hoard

(wûrd′hôrd′)
n.
The sum of words one uses or understands; a vocabulary.

[Translation of Old English wordhord.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

word′-hoard`



n.
a person's vocabulary.
[1890–95; literal modern rendering of Old English wordhord]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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word-hoard

noun
All the words of a language:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the Sauron/Sargon resemblance is to the moral disadvantage of the historical Akkadian king, who was more an Aragorn than a Sauron in fact, the fortuity of the resemblance between Tolkien's name and that of the ancient Mesopotamian king is a verbal gleam in the word-hoard eagerly seized upon by the ingenious scop.
It will soon be 'back-to-school' time and parents will be looking to buy the right age-appropriate dictionary for their children so here is the 2014 new edition of my favourite adult/family dictionary which will be a wonderful reference for many years to come.The Chambers Dictionary is the most useful and diverting single-column word-hoard available full of unique quirky definitions and word origins.
"A TORRID EYE" (ED #872) A demimondaine's Demand-- Kohl-dark, jet-dark-- A Jeanne d'Arc look-- The koh-i-noor's-- Start--Or a black Diamond's heart-- A star Diamond Mine's Depth-- Deep as her Mind's Own Word-hoard mined For half-whored Words-- Adored--redeemed-- By whom they deemed All but damned.
Opening Tolkien's word-hoard offers not only the most entertainment in this study but also a practical source for scholars and teachers.
Beowulf didn't "expostulate his valedictory." No, Beowulf "unlocked his word-hoard."