wordage


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word·age

 (wûr′dĭj)
n.
1. Words considered as a group, or the manner in which words are used: "He stammered indistinctly, searching for the correct wordage" (Tom Robbins).
2. The number of words used, as in a novel: Is the author's payment based on total wordage?

wordage

(ˈwɜːdɪdʒ)
n
(Linguistics) words considered collectively, esp a quantity of words

word•age

(ˈwɜr dɪdʒ)

n.
1. words collectively.
2. quantity or amount of words.
3. verbiage; wordiness.
4. choice of words; wording.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

wordage

noun
1. Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
2. Choice of words and the way in which they are used:
Translations

wordage

[ˈwɜːdɪdʒ] Nnúmero m or recuento m de palabras
References in periodicals archive ?
The situation is deadlocked because of this wordage,' he said yesterday.
How much more intoxicating to open up to the idea that some combination of wordage might come along that will flip a few neural switches and actually make you feel differently about something.
The book is well written with little excess wordage, and because of the thorough table of contents and index, it is very user friendly.
Of course, it is ideal, when both meaning and wordage could be preserved without much adjustment, to have both.
The entry on the largest territory in the British Empire--Canada--barely merited a six-line paragraph; the entry on Newfoundland (4) was granted slightly more wordage (Figure 2):
One other abortion-related wordage (again I don't know when the admonition was offered).
Reasons to be negative: This section could rival epic novel 'War and Peace' for wordage if all of the Dragons' ills this term and likely fears for the future next season were put to paper.
That wordage has been on my mind for a number of years, and I keep suggesting that the medical community can, and should, incorporate usage of health professions other than exclusively their own, for the benefit of society as a whole.
94) This meant that wordage recognised by the legal cultus as creating a right of property in moveables for an executor would create a similar right of property over land.
English eccentrics with an ear for a tune, hilarious wordage and a twinkle in the eye.
His performance is that of the knowing conductor, the show-teller who spends less wordage on his characters' states of feeling than on their clothes (and where they bought them) and where they go for dinner.