wordbook

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word·book

 (wûrd′bo͝ok′)
n.
A lexicon, vocabulary, or dictionary.

wordbook

(ˈwɜːdˌbʊk)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a book containing words, usually with their meanings
2. (Classical Music) a libretto for an opera

word•book

(ˈwɜrdˌbʊk)

n.
a book of words, usu. with definitions, explanations, etc.; a dictionary.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wordbook - a reference book containing words (usually with their meanings)wordbook - a reference book containing words (usually with their meanings)
book of facts, reference book, reference work, reference - a book to which you can refer for authoritative facts; "he contributed articles to the basic reference work on that topic"
dictionary, lexicon - a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about them
onomasticon - a list of proper nouns naming persons or places
vocabulary - a listing of the words used in some enterprise
glossary, gloss - an alphabetical list of technical terms in some specialized field of knowledge; usually published as an appendix to a text on that field
synonym finder, thesaurus - a book containing a classified list of synonyms

wordbook

noun
An alphabetical list of words often defined or translated:
Translations

wordbook

[ˈwɜːdbʊk] Nvocabulario m

wordbook

[ˈwɜːdˌbʊk] nvocabolario
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Keates's Appendix I, the original wordbooks for Messiah did not include biblical source references, and that may have been deliberate.
For what will remain for a century or more the definitive statement on the source materials, there are some surprising omissions from the lists of copies of wordbooks (or librettos as Clausen misleadingly calls them, confusing the abstract text with its physical instantiation).
In short, my students see me using dictionaries, they visit my office stuffed from floor to ceiling with wordbooks of all ilk, and they hear me discuss their native language as they complain sotto voce in the back of the room about having to learn what they never suspected to exist.
The methods of use of the dictionary, wordbooks, notebooks, or index cards as described by Celce- Murcia and McIntosh (1989) are often not applied in the preparatory class for the same reason.
Spanish and English learners will appreciate these attractively designed bilingual wordbooks.
Linguists and language centres have produced a range of resources for this purpose: wordbooks, bilingual dictionaries, learner's grammars, language learning courses, to name a few.