wordmonger


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word·mon·ger

 (wûrd′mŭng′gər, -mŏng′-)
n.
A writer or speaker who uses language pretentiously or carelessly.

word′mon′ger·ing n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wordmonger

(ˈwɜːdˌmʌŋɡə)
n
1. a person who uses words skilfully
2. censorious a person who uses words pretentiously
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

word•mon•ger

(ˈwɜrdˌmʌŋ gər, -ˌmɒŋ-)

n.
a writer or speaker who uses words pretentiously or with careless disregard for meaning.
[1580–90]
word′mon`ger•ing, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wordmonger - a writer who uses language carelessly or pretentiously with little regard for meaning
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It gives some an "A," others an "F." It prefers the wise philosopher to the clever wordmonger, the devout priest to the sentimentalist preacher, the real artist to the pornographer, the respectable lawyer to the shyster, the honest businessman to the conman, the responsible statesman to the demagogic deceiver, and the responsible financier to the greedy manipulator.
In effect, he co-opted orderly Conceptualism for the sake of dynamic messiness, feminism for the sake of a general gender skepticism (which Raymond Pettibon, another imagemaker and wordmonger, also nailed), and found a way to break into the closed conversation of academic late modernism.
(7) Bandele's Brixton Stories introduces London via Brixton and its market, overtly a bazaar but essentially a magic space where wordmongers offer "meanings, origins, synonyms, antonyms" (5) and sometimes "whole sentences", where dreamvendors, dream-seekers, shape-shifters, conjurer-clowns, moonstruck-magicians, deities and demons (43) send words "flying into the great void beyond sound or silence" (7) in the dream landscape inhabited by the Brixton Undead (3).