wordsmithery

wordsmithery

(ˈwɜːdˌsmɪθərɪ)
n
the craft or skill of a wordsmith
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Engaging the wordsmithery that won him such attention as a young Brussels-baiting journalist, he declared: "We will remain in the EU taxi; but this time locked in the boot, with absolutely no say on the destination."
The book demonstrates Egan's remarkable gifts, ranging from loose social satire to Foster Wallace-esque, footnote-strewn wordsmithery. The plot circles the music industry, with the promise of stardom, and the lure of genuine expression, the genie that tempts Egan's characters to excess and failure.
Wordsmithery uber rude truth evidently constitutes the second fundamental principle.
Jack Weaver, the city editor in the 13-person newsroom, a veteran of too many young reporters' strained wordsmithery, leaned back in his chair toward mine, just a yard away.
With beautiful wordsmithery and imagery, a touch of mystery, and a dreamlike romance, Hickman delivers her story by slowly acquainting readers with the secrets in Alex's and Sass's lives.
If you've never watched it, let the fact that they used the 'wordsmithery' in the opening minute be a guide.
Fans should be satisfied and newcomers bemused, then enchanted, by the wordsmithery on show - before running to Google to research all the elements of Eastern history.
Gilbert's wordsmithery is above and beyond foreign-language equivalence.
"It's the one abiding childhood holiday memory I have," said the 64-year-old who bring his uniquely British wordsmithery to Festival Number 6 in Portmeirion later this month.
The TV producer covering the game was impressed enough with that bit of wordsmithery to give its author a few seconds of TV time, but my precocious ten-year-old brain wasn't impressed.
"The word they use is 'witness, '" Gauthier replied, as if deferring to my wordsmithery skills.