wore


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Related to wore: wore out

wore

 (wôr)
v.
Past tense of wear.

wore

(wɔː)
vb
the past tense of wear1

wear

(wɛər)

v. wore, worn, wear•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to carry or have on the body or about the person as a covering, support, ornament, or the like: to wear a coat; to wear a wig.
2. to bear or have in one's aspect or appearance: to wear a smile.
3. to cause to deteriorate, diminish, or waste by some constant or repetitive action: The waves have worn these rocks.
4. to make (a hole, channel, way, etc.) by such action.
5. to consume gradually by use or any continued process: Illness had worn the bloom from her cheeks.
6. to weary; fatigue; exhaust.
7. to pass (time) gradually or tediously (usu. fol. by away or out).
8. Naut. to bring (a vessel) on another tack by turning until the wind is on the stern.
v.i.
9. to undergo gradual impairment, diminution, reduction, etc., from use, attrition, or other causes.
10. to retain shape, color, firmness, etc., under continued use or strain: a strong fabric that will wear.
11. (of time) to pass, esp. slowly or tediously (often fol. by on or away): As the day wore on, we grew more discouraged.
12. wear down,
a. to make or become shabbier, smaller, or more aged by wearing: to wear down the heels of one's shoes.
b. to make or become weary; tire.
c. to prevail upon or over by persistence; overcome: to wear down the opposition.
13. wear off, to diminish slowly or gradually or to diminish in effect; disappear: The drug began to wear off.
14. wear out,
a. to make or become unfit or useless through hard or extended use: to wear out clothes.
b. to expend, consume, or remove, esp. slowly or gradually.
c. to exhaust, as by continued strain; weary.
n.
15. the act of wearing; use, as of a garment: articles for winter wear.
16. the state of being worn, as on the person.
17. clothing or other articles for wearing, esp. for a particular function, fashion, or type of person (often used in combination): sleepwear; sportswear.
18. gradual impairment, wasting, diminution, etc., as from use.
19. the quality of resisting deterioration with use; durability.
Idioms:
wear thin,
a. to diminish; weaken: My patience is wearing thin.
b. to become less appealing, interesting, tolerable, etc.
[before 900; Middle English weren to have (clothes) on, waste, damage, Old English werian, c. Old Saxon werian, Old High German werien, Old Norse verja, Gothic wasjan to clothe; akin to Latin vestis clothing (see vest)]
wear′er, n.
Translations

wore

pret de wear
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, Celia wore scarcely more trimmings; and it was only to close observers that her dress differed from her sister's, and had a shade of coquetry in its arrangements; for Miss Brooke's plain dressing was due to mixed conditions, in most of which her sister shared.
I never wore a turned dress in my life; do you suppose people will know it?
We didn't care what we wore then, but thought it nice to tattoo ourselves all over, and we never did our hair.
Now, as for this pretty doll, my little Alice," said Grandfather, "I wish you could have seen what splendid dresses the ladies wore in those times.
Van Tassel wore these "dreadful things" it would never do to be left behind, in spite of her prejudices.
In summer time the men went entirely naked; in the winter and in bad weather the men wore a small robe, reaching to the middle of the thigh, made of the skins of animals, or of the wool of the mountain sheep.
Is it true that she wore so many diamonds that you couldn't tell where the diamonds left off and Jane began?
She always wore a simple white costume, that suited all the heads.
I don't think I like it only because it's so pretty, but I want to wear it as the girl in the story wore her bracelet, to remind me of something.
On the feet were some old boots with blue tops, such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn by means of the pole stuck up its back.
Toto barked at the fox-boy once or twice, not realizing it was his former friend who now wore the animal head; but Dorothy cuffed the dog and made him stop.
So when the Old Man was dead each of the youths put a weed upon his hat and wore it until he was himself old, when, seeing that neither would give in, they agreed that the younger should leave off his weeds and the elder give him half of the estate.