conditioning

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con·di·tion·ing

 (kən-dĭsh′ə-nĭng)
n.
1. A process of behavior modification by which a subject comes to associate a desired behavior with a previously unrelated stimulus.
2.
a. The process of training that results in physical fitness.
b. The state of physical fitness that results from such training.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conditioning

(kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ)
n
(Psychology) psychol the learning process by which the behaviour of an organism becomes dependent on an event occurring in its environment. See also classical conditioning, instrumental learning
adj
(Hairdressing & Grooming) (of a shampoo, cosmetic, etc) intended to improve the condition of something: a conditioning rinse.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•di•tion•ing

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ)

n.
1. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed.
2. Also called classical conditioning. a process in which a previously neutral stimulus comes to evoke a specific response by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that evokes the response.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
learning, acquisition - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge; "the child's acquisition of language"
experimental extinction, extinction - a conditioning process in which the reinforcer is removed and a conditioned response becomes independent of the conditioned stimulus
aversive conditioning - conditioning to avoid an aversive stimulus
classical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflex; the stimulus that evokes the reflex is given whether or not the conditioned response occurs until eventually the neutral stimulus comes to evoke the reflex
operant conditioning - conditioning in which an operant response is brought under stimulus control by virtue of presenting reinforcement contingent upon the occurrence of the operant response
counter conditioning - conditioning in which a second incompatible response is conditioned to an already conditioned stimulus; "counter conditioning lies behind many of the procedures used in behavior therapy"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

conditioning

noun training, education, teaching, accustoming, habituation Because of social conditioning, men don't expect to be managed by women.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ]
A. ADJ conditioning shampoochampú m acondicionador
B. N (social) → condicionamiento m
see also air B
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ] n
[person] → conditionnement m
[hair] → traitement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ] ncondizionamento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

con·di·tion·ing

n. acondicionamiento, condicionamiento.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

conditioning

n acondicionamiento; physical — acondicionamiento físico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.