workaholism


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work·a·hol·ic

 (wûr′kə-hô′lĭk, -hŏl′ĭk)
n.
One who has a compulsive and unrelenting need to work.

work′a·hol′ism n.

workaholism

(ˈwɜːkəhɒˌlɪzəm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the state of being a workaholic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.workaholism - compulsiveness about workingworkaholism - compulsiveness about working  
compulsiveness, compulsivity - the trait of acting compulsively
Translations
workoholismus
pracoholizm

workaholism

nWorkaholismus m (spec), → Arbeitssucht f
References in periodicals archive ?
On this basis, an auxiliary calculation between the alternative measure of workaholism (SNAP-Work) and hours worked was conducted, which indicated a similarly weak relationship (r=.
Rates of workaholism are higher among those with children and more than one-quarter of Canadians aged 15 and older, or 6.
Kipnis, a clinical psychologist in California, explained: "Alcoholism, drug abuse, workaholism, obsessive sexuality, numb complacency, and other dysfunctional behavior are increasing in reaction to the underlying pain and discomfort many men experience.
Although the topic of workaholism might be considered more central to industrial/organizational or personnel psychology, the rising interest among career development professionals in the issue warranted its coverage in this review.
However, the clash between my vision (however far-fetched) and my reality forces me to face, not for the first time, an unpleasant truth: I am far too prone to the self-serving workaholism so prized in our culture.
ABSTRACT Objectives This paper reviews and summarizes the literature on personality traits associated with workaholism and burnout, using the Five Factors Model (FFM) of personality.
Pedreira and Monico (2013)found PsyCap to be significantly related to enthusiastic workaholism and a positive relationship was also found between PsyCap and enthusiastic workaholism on workplace spirituality.
This phenomenon was described by Oates (1968), who first coined the term workaholism (addiction to work).
According to researchers, workaholism can co-occur with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety and depression, Health news reported.
It is no surprise that workaholism can induce stress, but a new study suggests that it may also be associated with psychiatric disorders.