workaholism


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work·a·hol·ic

 (wûr′kə-hô′lĭk, -hŏl′ĭk)
n.
One who has a compulsive and unrelenting need to work.

work′a·hol′ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

workaholism

(ˈwɜːkəhɒˌlɪzəm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the state of being a workaholic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.workaholism - compulsiveness about workingworkaholism - compulsiveness about working  
compulsiveness, compulsivity - the trait of acting compulsively
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
workoholismus
pracoholizm

workaholism

nWorkaholismus m (spec), → Arbeitssucht f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
However, what we don't realise is that workaholism has a long-term negative effect, not only on our well-being, but also, ironically, on our productivity.
Musk, Silicon Valley and the "Thank God it's Monday" movement have created the idea that performative workaholism is advantageous, but experts say it is otherwise.
Given the personal and organizational impacts, the nature of business executives' work and the need for further research on this group, the first hypothesis of this study is (H1) that both directions of conflict (WIF and FIW) are central to the research model that explain the interaction between work-family conflict, work engagement, workaholism and turnover intention in executives.
What might look like an admirable work ethic can go by another name: workaholism. And although the research hasn't been around that long, most experts agree that between 10 and 25 percent of U.S.
To prove his nationalism and workaholism' further, there was the "carotid operation" incident in 1996 in which he wanted to go back to work immediately, but Ming said no, thus for the first time, the family had Christmas dinner at a hospital.
I found Valente's chapter on "workaholism and over-achieverism" particularly insightful.
It draws on Choice Theory to elucidate the role of individuals in affecting their own well-being as well as that of others, and addresses how engagement and "workaholism" have key roles in impacting employee well-being at work; the importance of employees' behavioral conduct in dealing with ethical issues; the issue of cyberbullying and effects on well-being; sexual harassment; different perspectives on positivity at work; and how employee well-being is a matter of choice.
Having finished his last panto, he said: "Shaking off the workaholism I inherited as surely as the Alzheimer's was a positive thing for me.
Zonaira Shehper of Lahore School of Economics found that workaholism was positively associated with work-family inter-role conflict.
Destiny, talent, passion, zeal and a touch of "workaholism" have placed Adler in key positions to witness events shaping America's 20th- and 21st-century musical history.
Pressures to increase productivity--particularly in a hostile work environment--can affect the prevalence of workaholism, also referred to as work addiction (Aziz, Adkins, Walker, & Wuensch, 2010).