worker-priest


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work·er-priest

(wûr′kər-prēst′)
n. Roman Catholic Church
A priest, especially in France, who spends time in secular employment for missionary purposes.

worker-priest

n
(Roman Catholic Church) a Roman Catholic priest who has full-time or part-time employment in a secular job to be more closely in touch with the problems of the laity
Translations

worker-priest

[ˌwɜːkəˈpriːst] nprete m operaio
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1940s Dominican Father Jacques Loew started the worker-priest movement, where priests joined workers on the factory lines.
In 1950, however, the Vatican had condemned this Nouvelle Theologie, and soon condemned the French worker-priest movement.
Currently, he is a parttime pastor or worker-priest at St.
But somehow I always thought of him in the context of the worker-priest, a priest moulded into the heart of his community.
He studied theology at the University of Birmingham and was ordained as a worker-priest.
While it is common to see the origin of basic Christian communities in 1960's Brazil, Hinton also sees roots in the worker-priest movement of 1940's France and the Iona Community in 1930's Scotland.
The use of modern art in church buildings, a historical approach to the Bible, and the worker-priest movement -- priests who worked in factories, joined unions and supported protests for economic justice -- all alarmed the pope.
In a reversal of the church's position, the Second Vatican Council later restored the worker-priest movement.
Seeing the "immense potentialities of the North American people," Richard writes as an outsider, one who came to this country as a worker-priest in 1973.
The formations of Dan and his younger brother Phil (now 75 and 72 respectively) in the Catholic tradition and their experiences (Phil in combat, Dan influenced by the worker-priest movement in France) are noted as are the men's early brushes, as priests, with their religious superiors.
After his pontificate's shaky start -- his condemnation of "Action Francaise" achieved nothing save to split French Catholicism asunder, meanwhile handing opportunities on a plate to future worker-priests and useful Popular Front idiots -- Pius XI acknowledged, almost too late, Catholicism's political weakness.