workhour

workhour

(ˈwɜːkˌaʊə)
n
any time set aside for work
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
* Enhanced Workhour Flexibility Under Taiwan's LSA by Christine Chen (October 2018)
[42.] Von Thiele Schwarz U., Lindfors P, Lundberg U.: Health-related effects of worksite interventions involving physical exercise and reduced workhour. Scand.
Caption: Figure 7: Comparison of average workhour deviation before and after the resource allocation optimization of Agent S.
Laboratory technician time spent in MODS-related activities was prospectively recorded in a daily workhour diary, and comparative timing of each step of direct MODS DST with the existing standard (proportions method from Ogawa culture isolates) [7] was measured with a stopwatch.
Subsequently quoted in Justice Henry Billing Brown's opinion upholding workhour restrictions in smelters and mines, in Holden v.
Nonfarm business output per workhour increased 3 1/4 percent during the past year--likely more than 4 percent when measured by nonfarm business income.
(A look at the pros and cons of various workhour models, including CWs and flexitime.)
For example, since 1995 output per labor workhour in the nonfarm business sector--our standard measure of productivity--has grown at an annual rate of about 2 percent.
A partnership among six Chicago-area contractors who contributed goods or services, and more than 2,200 workhours brought the plaza to life.
Ironically, Marx distanced from his own ideas when convenient and once said 'I am not a Marxist.' Part of him was a humanist as he wanted to change the world for the better, but ironically opposed reforms like health care and shorter workhours claiming these made workers more bourgeois and less radical to push for real change.