working memory

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working memory

n.
1. A portion of digital memory reserved for data to be temporarily stored during the running of a program. Also called working storage.
2. The part of the mind that stores and manipulates information in the short term and is responsible for planning and carrying out behavior.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

working memory

n
(Psychology) psychol the current contents of a person's consciousness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.working memory - memory for intermediate results that must be held during thinking
remembering, memory - the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered; "he can do it from memory"; "he enjoyed remembering his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chimpanzees are more like humans than we think - and a study by scientists has confirmed there are 'remarkable' similarities between the working memories of the two species.
The participants tested their own working memories repeatedly, completing 10 sessions on a computer-based program that mimicked the old Highlights magazine game: stare at an image, then decide if subsequent images are identical or have subtle differences.
Coupling occurs when different types of brain rhythms coordinate with one another, and it helps us process and store working memories. Slow, low-frequency rhythms -- theta rhythms -- dance in the front of your brain, acting like the conductors of an orchestra.
Coupling occurs when different types of brain rhythms coordinate with one another, and it helps process and store working memories. Slow, low-frequency rhythms -- theta rhythms -- dance in the front of your brain, acting like the conductors of an orchestra.