working-class


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working class

n.
The socioeconomic class consisting of people who work for wages, especially low wages, including unskilled and semiskilled laborers and their families.

work′ing-class′ adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.working-class - of those who work for wages especially manual or industrial laborersworking-class - of those who work for wages especially manual or industrial laborers; "party of the propertyless proletariat"- G.B.Shaw
low-class, lower-class - occupying the lowest socioeconomic position in a society
2.working-class - working for hourly wages rather than fixed (e.g. annual) salaries; "working-class occupations include manual as well as industrial labor"
blue-collar - of or designating manual industrial work or workers
Translations

working-class

[ˈwɜːkɪŋklɑːs] ADJ [person, family] → de clase obrera, de clase trabajadora; [neighbourhood] → obrero
a self-educated man from a working-class backgroundun autodidacta de familia de clase obrera or trabajadora
to be working-classser de clase obrera or trabajadora
see also working

working-class

[ˌwɜːkɪŋˈklɑːs] adj to be working-classappartenere alla classe operaia
to come from a working-class background → venire da una famiglia di operai

working-class

طَبَقَةٌ عَامِلَة dělnická třída arbejderklasse- der Arbeiterklasse zugehörig της εργατικής τάξης de clase obrera työväenluokan ouvrier radničke klase classe operaia 労働者階級の 노동자 계급의 van arbeidersklasse arbeiderklasse- klasa robotnicza classe operária относящийся к рабочему классу arbetarklass- ชนชั้นผู้รับจ้าง işçi sınıfı giai cấp công nhân 工人阶级的
References in classic literature ?
His advertisement would be for board and room in some simple working-class family.
He never saw the dancing-school nor placed his advertisement for a room in a working-class family.
Springing from a long line of American descent, she was one of those wonderful working-class blooms which occasionally appear, defying all precedent of forebears and environment, apparently without cause or explanation.
This language also enabled him more intimately to follow their mental processes, and thereby to gather much data for a projected chapter in some future book which he planned to entitle Synthesis of Working-Class Psychology.
Once having mastered the language and conquered numerous fastidious qualms, he found that he could flow into any nook of working-class life and fit it so snugly as to feel comfortably at home.
Perhaps it was a recoil from his environment and training, or from the tempered seed of his ancestors, who had been book-men generation preceding generation; but at any rate, he found enjoyment in being down in the working-class world.
He was, after all, but one of a large number of heroes who, throughout the world, devoted their lives to the Revolution; though it must be conceded that he did unusual work, especially in his elaboration and interpretation of working-class philosophy.
Approximately one-third of working-class people in America (defined by income between the 20th and 50th percentile with no college degree) receive government safety-net benefits.
IN HER NEW BOOK, WHITE WORKING CLASS, which expands the notable Harvard Business Review article she wrote two days after the 2016 election, Joan Williams attempts: 1) to explain to political, media, and business elites the white working class's composition, concerns, and desires; and more importantly for her, 2) to persuade her fellow progressives that white working-class voters can be won back only if Democrats focus more on class and less on race, gender, and other themes.
While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Professor Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness.
Fifty years ago, the distinction between middle class and working class was disappearing into a "middle-income" group, as working-class incomes were a substantial fraction of, and, in some places, equal to, middle-class incomes.
The author utilizes twenty-seven Mexico City penny press newspapers to illustrate how the editors of these papers produced a sentimental education for working-class men that was "less patronizing, less coercive, more realistic, and more comprehensive than anything produced by the authorities" (5).