worsted

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Related to worsteds: worsted yarn

wor·sted

 (wo͝os′tĭd, wûr′stĭd)
n.
1.
a. Firm-textured, compactly twisted woolen yarn made from long-staple fibers.
b. Fabric made from such yarn.
2. Natural or synthetic yarn of a medium weight.

[Middle English, variant of worthstede, after Worthstede (Worstead), a village of eastern England.]

wor′sted adj.

worsted

(ˈwʊstɪd)
n
1. (Textiles) a closely twisted yarn or thread made from combed long-staple wool
2. (Textiles) a fabric made from this, with a hard smooth close-textured surface and no nap
3. (Textiles) (modifier) made of this yarn or fabric: a worsted suit.
[C13: named after Worstead, a district in Norfolk]

wor•sted

(ˈwʊs tɪd, ˈwɜr stɪd)

n.
1. firmly twisted yarn or thread spun from combed, stapled wool fibers of the same length, for weaving, knitting, etc. Compare woolen.
2. wool cloth woven from such yarns, having a hard, smooth surface and no nap.
adj.
3. consisting or made of worsted.
[1250–1300; Middle English, after Worstede Worstead (Old English Wurthestede), parish in Norfolk, England, where the cloth was made]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worsted - a woolen fabric with a hard textured surface and no nap; woven of worsted yarns "he wore a worsted suit"
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
2.worsted - a tightly twisted woolen yarn spun from long-staple wool
thread, yarn - a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving
Translations

worsted

[ˈwʊstɪd] N (= cloth) → estambre m

worsted

[ˈwʊstɪd] nlaine f peignée

worsted

n (= yarn)Kammgarn nt; (= cloth also)Kammgarnstoff m
adjKammgarn-; worsted suitKammgarnanzug m; worsted woolKammgarn nt

worsted

[ˈwʊstɪd] n (cloth) → pettinato
wool worsted → lana pettinata
References in classic literature ?
Snow, was knitting wonderful things out of bright colored worsteds that trailed their cheery lengths across the white spread, and made Pollyanna--again like Mrs.
"Here are your worsted leggins, for it will be cold; but the muff I shall keep for myself, for it is so very pretty.
He knew that the best thing he could do was to cease coming to the tea-shop, but he could not bear to think that he had been worsted in the affair, and he devised a plan to show her that he despised her.
"My friends," said he, "is there any man bold enough to venture the Trojans, and cut off some straggler, or us news of what the enemy mean to do whether they will stay here by the ships away from the city, or whether, now that they have worsted the Achaeans, they will retire within their walls.
Harling dropped her worsted and examined the visitor with quick, keen eyes.
The retribution that followed every vengeful success was so sweeping and majestic that the boys always retired from the field badly worsted. At last they con- spired together and hit upon a plan that promised a dazzling victory.
Wopsle with red worsted legs under a highly magnified phosphoric countenance and a shock of red curtain-fringe for his hair, engaged in the manufacture of thunderbolts in a mine, and displaying great cowardice when his gigantic master came home (very hoarse) to dinner.
They wear a capot or surcoat, made of a blanket, a striped cotton shirt, cloth trousers, or leathern leggins, moccasins of deer-skin, and a belt of variegated worsted, from which are suspended the knife, tobacco-pouch, and other implements.
One peculiarity of his black clothes and of his black stockings, be they silk or worsted, is that they never shine.
The little kitten brightened, its eyes shone, and it seemed ready to lift its tail, jump down on its soft paws, and begin playing with the ball of worsted as a kitten should.
He again held up his foot, which had a gouty appearance owing to its being contained in a dumpy little worsted sock, and I thought he proposed to repeat his first performance, but in this I did him an injustice, for, unlike Porthos, he was one who scorned to do the same feat twice; perhaps, like the conjurors, he knew that the audience were more on the alert the second time.
"I kin remember when her two feet was no bigger dan yer t'umb, and she weared worsted boots," moaned she.