wouldst

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wouldst

 (wo͝odst) or would·est (wo͝od′ĭst)
v. Archaic
Second person singular past tense of will2.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wouldst

(wʊdst)
vb
archaic or dialect (used with the pronoun: thou or its relative equivalent) a singular form of the past tense of will1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

will1

(wɪl)

auxiliary v.andv., pres. will; auxiliary verb.
1. am (is, are, etc.) about or going to: I will be there tomorrow. She will see you at dinner.
2. am (is, are, etc.) disposed or willing to: People will do right.
3. am (is, are, etc.) expected or required to: You will report to the principal at once.
4. may be expected or supposed to: You will not have forgotten him.
5. am (is, are, etc.) determined or sure to (used emphatically): People will talk.
6. am (is, are, etc.) accustomed to, or do usually or often: She would write for hours at a time.
7. am (is, are, etc.) habitually disposed or inclined to: Tyrants will be tyrants.
8. am (is, are, etc.) capable of; can: This tree will live without water for three months.
v.t., v.i.
9. to wish; desire; like: Take what you will. Ask, if you will, who the owner is.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wyllan, c. Old Saxon willian, Old Norse vilja, Gothic wiljan; akin to Latin velle to wish]
usage: See shall.

will2

(wɪl)

n.
1. the faculty of conscious and particularly of deliberate action: the freedom of the will.
2. power of choosing one's own actions: to have a strong will.
3. the act or process of using or asserting one's choice; volition: My hands are obedient to my will.
4. wish or desire: to submit against one's will.
5. purpose or determination: to have the will to succeed.
6. the wish or purpose as carried out, or to be carried out: to work one's will.
7. disposition, whether good or ill, toward another.
8. a legal document in which a person specifies the disposition of his or her property after death. Compare testament.
v.t.
9. to decide upon, bring about, or attempt to effect or bring about by an act of will: He can walk if he wills it.
10. to purpose, determine on, or elect by act of will: If you will success, you can find it.
11. to dispose of (property) by a will; bequeath.
12. to influence by or as if by exerting will power: I willed her to survive the crisis.
v.i.
13. to exercise the will.
14. to decide or determine: Others debate, but the king wills.
Idioms:
at will, as one desires; whenever one chooses: to wander off at will.
[before 900; Middle English will(e), Old English will(a), c. Old Saxon willio, Old High German willo, Old Norse vili, Gothic wilja; akin to will1]
will′er, n.
will′-less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Step on board and let him conduct thee; but if thou wouldest behold thy kingdom again, see that thou takest not the name of Allah into thy mouth."
"Jesus saith unto her, Said I not unto thee that if thou wouldest believe, thou shouldest see the glory of God?
ALICIA: Wouldest thou prefer the breast or the leg?
If remaining a widow, thou wouldest have the same pomp, the same show, the same attire, as thou hadst while thy husband was living, it were better for thee to marry.
Were thy disapointed selfe possest with such a spirit as inhabiteth my face, thou wouldest neuer goe fidlinge thy pamphletes from doore to dore like a blinde harper'; Ingenioso replies to this, 'Spirit calest thou it?
And he answered, Thou shalt not smite them: wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword and with thy bow?
Those manifold faculties Thou lettest fall upon several men Thou wouldst not have drenched up where they light but wouldest have derived, through the channels of their special vocations, into the common streams of public use for Church or Commonwealth.
I fear me, love, if that I had been dead, Thou wouldest not have mourned so much for me.
[...] Jehovah thy God hath led thee these forty years in the wilderness, that he might humble thee, to prove thee, to know what was in thy heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or not.
The boy's concern gives the aging Santiago's loss of independence an almost biblical resonance: "When thou wast young, thou girdest thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shalt be old, thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and carry thee whither thou wouldest not" (John 21:18).
fate to fulfill before thou comest to thy native land thou wouldest
these thinges whiche belonge unto thy peace, even at this daie, thou wouldest take hede.