wrathful


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Related to wrathful: wrathfully, Simonists

wrath·ful

 (răth′fəl, räth′-)
adj.
Full of or characterized by wrath; fiercely angry. See Synonyms at angry.

wrath′ful·ly adv.
wrath′ful·ness n.

wrathful

(ˈrɒθfʊl)
adj
1. full of wrath; raging or furious
2. resulting from or expressing wrath
Also (informal): wrathy
ˈwrathfully adv
ˈwrathfulness n

wrath•ful

(ˈræθ fəl, ˈrɑθ-; esp. Brit. ˈrɔθ-)

adj.
1. extremely angry; enraged.
2. characterized by or showing wrath: wrathful words.
[1250–1300]
wrath′ful•ly, adv.
wrath′ful•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wrathful - vehemently incensed and condemnatory; "they trembled before the wrathful queen"; "but wroth as he was, a short struggle ended in reconciliation"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

wrathful

adjective angry, raging, furious, choked, pissed (taboo slang), infuriated, incensed, enraged, indignant, pissed off (taboo slang), irate, displeased, incandescent, wroth (archaic) He feared his stern and wrathful father.
happy, pleased, delighted, contented, satisfied, calm, glad, amused, gratified, joyful

wrathful

adjective
Full of or marked by extreme anger:
Idioms: fit to be tied, foaming at the mouth, in a rage, in a towering rage.
Translations
غاضِب جِدا، حانِق
vred
ofsareiîur

wrathful

[ˈrɒθfʊl] ADJ (liter) → colérico, iracundo

wrathful

adj, wrathfully
advwutentbrannt, zornentbrannt

wrath

(roθ) , ((American) rӕθ) noun
violent anger.
ˈwrathful adjective
References in classic literature ?
And Jo pulled her hair again with a wrathful tweak.
It occurs once in Shakespeare: -- The wrathful skies
The gloomy taint that was in the Murdstone blood, darkened the Murdstone religion, which was austere and wrathful.
If I thought so,'' said Gurth ``if I could but think so but no I saw the javelin was well aimed I heard it whizz through the air with all the wrathful malevolence of him who cast it, and it quivered after it had pitched in the ground, as if with regret for having missed its mark.
With trenchant swords upraised and poised on high, it seemed as though the two valiant and wrathful combatants stood threatening heaven, and earth, and hell, with such resolution and determination did they bear themselves.
And when he was compelled to retire again, he did it slowly, sul- lenly, taking steps of wrathful despair.
The pedlar meditated with much fervor on the charms of the young schoolmistress, and swore that Daniel Webster never spoke nor looked so like an angel as Miss Higginbotham, while defending him from the wrathful populace at Parker's Falls.
The Baroness also turned in my direction, and gazed at me in wrathful perplexity, while some of the passers-by also began to stare at us, and others of them halted outright.
From the west sky a wrathful shine--all that wild March could afford in the way of sunset--had burst forth after the cloudy day, flooding the tired and sticky faces of the threshers, and dyeing them with a coppery light, as also the flapping garments of the women, which clung to them like dull flames.
Fog in the eyes and throats of ancient Greenwich pensioners, wheezing by the firesides of their wards; fog in the stem and bowl of the afternoon pipe of the wrathful skipper, down in his close cabin; fog cruelly pinching the toes and fingers of his shivering little 'prentice boy on deck.
One can distinguish on its ruins three sorts of lesions, all three of which cut into it at different depths; first, time, which has insensibly notched its surface here and there, and gnawed it everywhere; next, political and religious revolution, which, blind and wrathful by nature, have flung themselves tumultuously upon it, torn its rich garment of carving and sculpture, burst its rose windows, broken its necklace of arabesques and tiny figures, torn out its statues, sometimes because of their mitres, sometimes because of their crowns; lastly, fashions, even more grotesque and foolish, which, since the anarchical and splendid deviations of the Renaissance, have followed each other in the necessary decadence of architecture.
Fouquet's voice drew the young prince from his wrathful reverie.