wretch

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wretch

 (rĕch)
n.
1. A miserable, unfortunate, or unhappy person.
2. A person regarded as base, mean, or despicable: "a stony adversary, an inhuman wretch" (Shakespeare).

[Middle English wrecche, from Old English wrecca, exiles, wretch.]

wretch

(rɛtʃ)
n
1. a despicable person
2. a person pitied for his misfortune
[Old English wrecca; related to Old Saxon wrekkeo, Old High German reccheo (German Recke warrior), Old Norse rek(n)ingr]

wretch

(rɛtʃ)

n.
1. a deplorably unfortunate or unhappy person.
2. a person of despicable or base character.
[before 900; Middle English wrecche, Old English wrecca miserable person, exile, c. Old Saxon wrekkio, Old High German reccheo]
retch, wretch - Retch is the verb to vomit or gag; wretch is a noun for a pitiable person.
See also related terms for vomit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wretch - performs some wicked deed
miscreant, reprobate - a person without moral scruples
2.wretch - someone you feel sorry forwretch - someone you feel sorry for    
victim - an unfortunate person who suffers from some adverse circumstance

wretch

noun
1. poor thing, unfortunate, poor soul, poor devil (informal), miserable creature Before the wretch had time to reply, he was shot.
2. scoundrel, rat (informal), shit (taboo slang), worm, bastard (offensive), villain, rogue, bugger (taboo slang), outcast, swine, rascal, son-of-a-bitch (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), asshole (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), profligate, turd (taboo slang), vagabond, ruffian, motherfucker (taboo slang, chiefly U.S.), cur, rotter (slang, chiefly Brit.), scumbag (slang), good-for-nothing, miscreant, bad egg (old-fashioned informal), blackguard, mother (taboo slang, chiefly U.S.), cocksucker (taboo slang), asswipe (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), wrong 'un (informal) I think he's a mean-minded, vindictive old wretch.

wretch

noun
A person living under very unhappy circumstances:
Translations
مَخْلوق بائِس، صُعْلوكوَغْد، دنيء
stakkelstymper
hitvány emberszerencsétlen alak
aumingi, óòokkivesalingur
nepasisekimasnetikusiai
bēdulisnabadziņšnelaimīgaisnelietis
köftehorsefil yaratıkzavallı kimse

wretch

[retʃ] Ndesgraciado/a m/f, miserable mf
little wretch (often hum) → pícaro/a m/f, granuja mf
some poor wretchalgún desgraciado, algún pobre diablo

wretch

[ˈrɛtʃ] n
(= unfortunate person) → malheureux/euse m/f
poor wretch → pauvre malheureux/euse m/f
(often humorous) (= bad person) → misérable mf
little wretch! → petit(e) misérable!

wretch

n
(miserable) → armer Teufel or Schlucker (inf)
(contemptible) → Wicht m, → Schuft m; (= nuisance)Blödmann m (inf); (= child)Schlingel m

wretch

[rɛtʃ] ndisgraziato/a, sciagurato/a
little wretch! (often) (hum) → birbante!

wretch

(retʃ) noun
1. a miserable, unhappy creature. The poor wretch!
2. a name used in annoyance or anger. You wretch!
wretched (ˈretʃid) adjective
1. very poor or miserable. They live in a wretched little house.
2. used in annoyance. This wretched machine won't work!
ˈwretchedly adverb
ˈwretchedness noun
References in classic literature ?
For my own part, if it was an honest man's child, indeed--but for my own part, it goes against me to touch these misbegotten wretches, whom I don't look upon as my fellow-creatures.
The wickedness of those two wretches came to my poor dear husband's knowledge.
She took her feet in her hands, a gesture habitual with unhappy wretches who are cold, as we have already seen in the case of the recluse of the Tour-Roland, and her teeth chattered.
miserable wretches that we are, 'tis that name which has ruined us
point of the island, I was perfectly confounded and amazed; nor is it possible for me to express the horror of my mind at seeing the shore spread with skulls, hands, feet, and other bones of human bodies; and particularly I observed a place where there had been a fire made, and a circle dug in the earth, like a cockpit, where I supposed the savage wretches had sat down to their human feastings upon the bodies of their fellow-creatures.
In this frame of thankfulness I went home to my castle, and began to be much easier now, as to the safety of my circumstances, than ever I was before: for I observed that these wretches never came to this island in search of what they could get; perhaps not seeking, not wanting, or not expecting anything here; and having often, no doubt, been up the covered, woody part of it without finding anything to their purpose.
As in my present condition there were not really many things which I wanted, so indeed I thought that the frights I had been in about these savage wretches, and the concern I had been in for my own preservation, had taken off the edge of my invention, for my own conveniences; and I had dropped a good design, which I had once bent my thoughts upon, and that was to try if I could not make some of my barley into malt, and then try to brew myself some beer.
I went so far with it in my imagination that I employed myself several days to find out proper places to put myself in ambuscade, as I said, to watch for them, and I went frequently to the place itself, which was now grown more familiar to me; but while my mind was thus filled with thoughts of revenge and a bloody putting twenty or thirty of them to the sword, as I may call it, the horror I had at the place, and at the signals of the barbarous wretches devouring one another, abetted my malice.
But you can't go back to saying that people are wretches nowadays.
Some time back, she also recorded a tune for a documentary called Wretches andJabberers about two autistic friends and did The Break Up album with Pete Yorn in 2006.
But many poor wretches gambled away their few pennies and then their families' pitiful possessions, before turning to stealing to feed their families.
Adults no longer engage with children because a vast tranche of them are vile, spiteful, evil little wretches with the foulest mouths and a tendency to violence that would have shocked Attila the Hun.