wringing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to wringing: hand wringing

wring

 (rĭng)
tr.v. wrung (rŭng), wring·ing, wrings
1.
a. To twist, squeeze, or compress, especially so as to extract liquid. Often used with out: wring out a wet towel.
b. To extract (liquid) by twisting or compressing. Often used with out: wrung the water out of my bathing suit.
2. To wrench or twist forcibly or painfully: wring the neck of a chicken.
3.
a. To clasp and twist or squeeze (one's hands), as in distress.
b. To clasp firmly and shake (another's hand), as in congratulation.
4. To cause distress to; affect with painful emotion: a tale that wrings the heart.
5. To obtain or extract by applying force or pressure: wrung the truth out of the recalcitrant witness.
n.
The act or an instance of wringing.

[Middle English wringen, from Old English wringan; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wringing

(ˈrɪŋɪŋ) ;

wringing wet

adj
extremely wet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] ADJ (also wringing wet) → empapado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] adj (also wringing wet) → tout mouillé(e), trempé(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wringing

adj (also wringing wet)tropfnass; person alsopatschnass (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] adj (also wringing wet) → bagnato/a fradicio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not, that we be not judged.
"Yes, indeed, if you want to," answered Phebe, wringing out her cloth in a capable sort of way that impressed Rose very much.
'You would serve me best, lady,' replied the girl, wringing her hands, 'if you could take my life at once; for I have felt more grief to think of what I am, to-night, than I ever did before, and it would be something not to die in the hell in which I have lived.
"What's the meaning of this, of the Esmeralda?" said Gringoire, wringing his hands in despair.
'I need not entreat your sympathy,' he said, wringing her hand, 'for I know your nature.
We had one in the yard, its rollers and handle capable of wringing gallons of water out of several sheets in a matter of seconds, but we were always warned to keep our fingers out of harm's way.
Tankers, stop wringing your hands when it comes lo problems with random shorts in electronic components that sit under the breech.
She wrings her hands (like wringing out the wash) trying to mourn the stranger lying there, remote in his final traveling clothes, the skull beneath his skin rising to the surface as surely as the moon's white skull rises at the window, snuffing out innocent stars.
For wringing the heart of its blood, for unstringing our gut No killer like love.
I disagree with both the purpose for "wringing out" guns and the knowledge you might receive in doing so.
"Their conscience will be wringing wet about this and I would hope they would hand themselves in."