wringing


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Related to wringing: hand wringing

wring

 (rĭng)
tr.v. wrung (rŭng), wring·ing, wrings
1.
a. To twist, squeeze, or compress, especially so as to extract liquid. Often used with out: wring out a wet towel.
b. To extract (liquid) by twisting or compressing. Often used with out: wrung the water out of my bathing suit.
2. To wrench or twist forcibly or painfully: wring the neck of a chicken.
3.
a. To clasp and twist or squeeze (one's hands), as in distress.
b. To clasp firmly and shake (another's hand), as in congratulation.
4. To cause distress to; affect with painful emotion: a tale that wrings the heart.
5. To obtain or extract by applying force or pressure: wrung the truth out of the recalcitrant witness.
n.
The act or an instance of wringing.

[Middle English wringen, from Old English wringan; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wringing

(ˈrɪŋɪŋ) ;

wringing wet

adj
extremely wet
Translations

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] ADJ (also wringing wet) → empapado

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] adj (also wringing wet) → tout mouillé(e), trempé(e)

wringing

adj (also wringing wet)tropfnass; person alsopatschnass (inf)

wringing

[ˈrɪŋɪŋ] adj (also wringing wet) → bagnato/a fradicio/a
References in classic literature ?
It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not, that we be not judged.
Yes, indeed, if you want to," answered Phebe, wringing out her cloth in a capable sort of way that impressed Rose very much.
You would serve me best, lady,' replied the girl, wringing her hands, 'if you could take my life at once; for I have felt more grief to think of what I am, to-night, than I ever did before, and it would be something not to die in the hell in which I have lived.
I need not entreat your sympathy,' he said, wringing her hand, 'for I know your nature.
Tankers, stop wringing your hands when it comes lo problems with random shorts in electronic components that sit under the breech.
Carol, don't stand there wringing your hands - or wringing out your socks.
She wrings her hands (like wringing out the wash) trying to mourn the stranger lying there, remote in his final traveling clothes, the skull beneath his skin rising to the surface as surely as the moon's white skull rises at the window, snuffing out innocent stars.
For wringing the heart of its blood, for unstringing our gut No killer like love.
1 : to pull away by twisting or wringing <I had to wrest my shoe from the dog's mouth.
Their conscience will be wringing wet about this and I would hope they would hand themselves in.
Of course, such hand wringing is often an inviting target.
After much soul searching and hand wringing over ho would be honored as the 2006 Skater of the Year, we had what alcoholics refer to as a moment of clarity.