wristy

wristy

(ˈrɪstɪ)
adj
(Ball Games, other than specified) (of a player's style of hitting the ball in cricket, tennis, etc) characterized by considerable movement of the wrist
References in periodicals archive ?
The Pakistan international passed 500 for the tournament and 4,000 career T20 runs in an innings characterised by wristy elegance and clever innovation.
In the rain-marred clash at the Adelaide Oval which was curtailed to 30 overs per side, India collected a decent 180-6 on the back of Azharuddin's wristy innings of 79 from 77 balls which was terminated in the last over of the innings by paceman Meyrick Pringle.
Tai Tzu, however, played some wristy shots to get better off Sindhu and clinched the opening game 21-14.
Laxman, the wristy Indian batting great whose 281 stopped the mighty Australians in Kolkata in 2001, is set to release his autobiography on November 19.
Very occasionally he drove through the covers, but often his scoring came through wristy flicks on the leg side or dabbed cuts to third man.
Occasionally, Tai shaped up for a seemingly delicate effort at the net, only to come up with a vicious wristy shot to a far corner of the court.
McNay, who was playing the anchor role and giving the strike to his partners as much as possible, was joined by Juan Martins and the pair put on 86 runs with Martins looking in good form playing some wristy shots and scoring an effortless 56 before being caught on the boundary.
The Islamabad United batter holds the bat real low and has a bit of Virender Sehwag about him; although the Charsadda-born isn't as wristy and seems to favour the on side more.
1-ranked doubles player with a double-handed grip on both sides.With a mix of slice and chips, lobs and bunts, whippy half-volleys and wristy crosscourt ground strokes off both wings, Hsieh pushed Kerber to the extremes and unsettled her rhythm.
Azharuddin was one of that rare breed of players blessed with wristy batsmanship along with ML Jaisimha and VVS Laxman and he said that he see shades of himself and the other two in current Indian captain Virat Kohli and Ajinkya Rahane.
During his playing career, Raja was known primarily as a dashing middle-order left-handed batsman, with a characteristically generous backlift and breathtaking strokeplay combining a keen eye with wristy execution.
Shah, working on the 'attack is the best form of defence' principle, unfurled a series of wristy flicks, cuts and drives to hit the ropes on five occasions before his partner Coles departed with under eight overs remaining.