wuther

wuther

(ˈwʌðə)
vb (intr)
dialect English (of wind) to blow forcefully with a roaring sound
References in periodicals archive ?
WUTHER A Sullen roaring, as the wind B To jumble C Fourth stage of the Great Ice Age who am I?
After she sleeps and awakens, this time in a bed, she feels like having been reinstated in the ghostly reality of Madame Beck's dormitory, which is the house of her virtual entombment: she momentarily becomes alarmed by "'the wuther' of the wind amongst the trees, denoting a garden outside" and "the chill, the whiteness, the solitude, amidst which I lay.
Consequently, "Cathy and Heathcliff enact a drama of desire and identification in which their separate selves wuther into the other" (Vine 350).
KATE Bush strutted back on stage last night for the first time in 35 years - with the Wuther of all comeback performances.