x-radiation


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Related to x-radiation: gamma radiation, ultraviolet radiation, Xrays

x-ra·di·a·tion

(ĕks′rā′dē-ā′shən)
n.
1. Treatment with or exposure to x-rays.
2. Radiation composed of x-rays.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

x-radiation

n
(General Physics) another term for X-ray
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

x-ra•di•a•tion

(ˈɛksˌreɪ diˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
radiation in the form of x-rays.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.x-radiation - electromagnetic radiation of short wavelength produced when high-speed electrons strike a solid targetX-radiation - electromagnetic radiation of short wavelength produced when high-speed electrons strike a solid target
ionizing radiation - high-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes
electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic wave, nonparticulate radiation - radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge
2.X-radiation - obtaining images by the use of X rays
tomography, imaging - (medicine) obtaining pictures of the interior of the body
computed axial tomography, computed tomography, computerized axial tomography, computerized tomography, CT, CAT - a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It commemorates the anniversary of the discovery of x-radiation by German physicist Wilhelm R?ntgen in 1895, an achievement that earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics six years later.
For controls, we transferred another 30 spiders from 10 colonies collected from the same area and not subjected to x-radiation into identical plastic containers.
The date marks the anniversary of the discovery of x-radiation by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895.
--Nikola Tesla published ten papers on X-radiation from March 11, 1896 to August 11, 1897, and laid the basic principles of radiology and first proved the harmfulness of X-radiation on human body [7, 9];
Veiko, "Oxidative stress as a significant factor for development of an adaptive response in irradiated and nonirradiated human lymphocytes after inducing the bystander effect by low-dose X-radiation," Mutation Research, vol.
Extragalactic X-rays "For the first time, X-radiation coming from the direction of individual galaxies has been measured.
The detection of eupyrene bundles of abnormal morphology may be explained by nuclear fragmentations, cellular necrosis, and chromosome breaks, which commonly result from X-radiation treatments (Coggins 1973).
"Furthermore, wearable devices might be potentially equipped with filter lenses that provide protection against X-radiation. We believe wearable computers have a great potential to optimize percutaneous revascularization, and thus favorably affect interventional cardiologists in their daily clinical activities."
Hard X-radiation is therefore ideal for this purpose, because it penetrates matter and exhibits wavelengths of a few hundredths of a nanometre.