photon

(redirected from x-ray photon)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to x-ray photon: X-radiation

pho·ton

 (fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

(ˈfəʊtɒn)
n
(Atomic Physics) a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, regarded as a particle with zero rest mass and charge, unit spin, and energy equal to the product of the frequency of the radiation and the Planck constant

pho•ton

(ˈfoʊ tɒn)

n.
a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, usu. considered as an elementary particle that is its own antiparticle and that has zero rest mass and charge and a spin of one.
[1926; < Greek phōt- (see phot) + -on1]
pho•ton′ic, adj.

pho·ton

(fō′tŏn′)
The smallest unit of light or other electromagnetic energy, having no mass and no electric charge. Photons behave both as particles and waves. See Note at electromagnetic radiation.

photon

A unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.photon - a quantum of electromagnetic radiation; an elementary particle that is its own antiparticle
gauge boson - a particle that mediates the interaction of two elementary particles
electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic wave, nonparticulate radiation - radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge
Translations

photon

[ˈfəʊtɒn] Nfotón m

photon

[ˈfəʊtɒn] nphoton mphoto opportunity nséance f de photos (pour la presse)photo-sensitive [ˌfəʊtəʊˈsɛnsɪtɪv] adjphotosensiblephoto session nséance f photophoto shoot photo-shoot [ˈfəʊtəʊʃuːt] nséance f photo

photon

nPhoton nt
References in periodicals archive ?
This new scanner actually matches specific X-ray photon wavelengths to materials and assigns a corresponding color to them The data is then configured into a full-color, three-dimensional image that will help doctors create personalized treatment plans with targeted drug therapies.
For sparse events such an 8-neighbour pixel filtration works sufficiently while for denser areas made by longer exposures it filters out even hidden one-pixel X-ray photon events.
Current data show that TSXS exhibits a good and steady performance in X-ray photon collection.
When photon energy of the incoming X-ray is about to be higher than binding energy between core-level electron and nucleus, the X-ray photon energy will be absorbed and then will knock the core electron out as a photoelectron.
Valence or higher-energy level electrons from the target move into these lower orbits to fill the gap and an X-ray photon is released (Charles Sturt University, 2002; Garip, 1998).
where [mu] is X-ray linear attenuation coefficient, [rho] is the electron density, a is a fitting parameter, Z is the effective atomic number, E is X-ray photon energy, and [f.sub.KN](E) is the Klein-Nishina function which yields the electronic cross section of Compton scattering.
When an X-ray photon collides with an atom, the atom may absorb the energy of the photon and boost an electron to a higher orbital level or if the photon is very energetic, it may knock an electron from the atom altogether, causing the atom to ionize.
The next steps involve extending the analysis of surface structure to "a full quantitative analysis", according to McNeill, "This would require imaging at multiple X-ray photon energies." But the longer exposure times requires could damage the surfaces being studied.
where S(E) is the braking capacity of the target material, measured in [10.sup.-15] eV x [cm.sup.2]/atom, the values are taken from [6]; co is the fluorescent yield, values taken from [7]; [sigma](E) is the ionisation cross-section at the proton energy E; N is the number of protons; 8 and d[omega] are the efficiency and solid angle of the detector; u is the linear coefficient of attenuation, the values are taken from [7-9]; [alpha] and P are the generalised angles between the normal to the target and the direction of movement of the proton and the x-ray photon, respectively (Fig.
Sectra's solution, based on a detector technology that counts each X-ray photon, generates a very low dose of radiation.
It is often assumed that the x-ray photon counting used in x-ray absorption is approximately a Poisson process in which the uncertainty is the square root of the number of counts [6,7].
Soft X-ray beamlines will be used to study the chemistry and structure of gases, liquids and solids by measuring the absorption of the light, as well as the energies and directions of various particles such as electrons emitted after a soft X-ray photon is absorbed.

Full browser ?