x-rays


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Related to x-rays: Gamma rays, MRI, ultraviolet

x-ray

or X-ray (ĕks′rā′)
n. or x ray or X ray
1.
a. A photon of electromagnetic radiation of very short wavelength, ranging from about 10 down to 0.01 nanometers, and very high energy, ranging from about 100 up to 100,000 electron volts.
b. often x-rays or X-rays A narrow beam of such photons. X-rays are used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. Also called roentgen ray.
2.
a. A photograph taken with x-rays.
b. The act or process of taking such a photograph: Did the patient move during the x-ray?
tr.v. x-rayed, x-ray·ing, x-rays or X-rayed or X-ray·ing or X-rays
1. To irradiate with x-rays.
2. To photograph with x-rays.

[From translation of obsolete German X-Strahlen, x-rays (coined by their discoverer Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen ) : x, x, unknown factor (since x-rays were a previously unknown form of radiation) + Strahlen, pl. of Strahle, ray.]

X-rays

1. Electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength between those of ultraviolet light and gamma rays.
2. Short-wavelength streams of photons used to penetrate a patients’s body tissues for diagnostic purposes, such as to produce an X-ray image of the inside of the body, or as a form of therapy, such as to destroy diseased tissue.
Translations

X-rays

(eksˈreiz) noun plural
rays which can pass through many substances impossible for light to pass through, and which produce a picture of the object through which they have passed.
ˌX-ˈray noun
(the process of taking) a photograph using X-rays. I'm going to hospital for an X-ray; We'll take an X-ray of your chest; (also adjective) an X-ray photograph.
verb
to take a photograph of using X-rays. They X-rayed my arm to see if it was broken.

x-rays

n. rayos-x (equis), radiografía.
1. ondas electromagnéticas de alta energía de radiación que se usan para penetrar tejidos y órganos del cuerpo y registrar densidades en una placa o pantalla;
2. placa fotográfica o fluorescente que obtiene la imagen de estructuras internas del organismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, Oct 5 (ANI): A new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health has revealed that diagnostic X-rays may increase the risk of developing childhood leukemia.
NOVEMBER 8, 1895--Wilhelm Rontgen discovers X-rays while conducting experiments to test whether cathode rays could pass through glass; in the process of the experiments, he noticed a faint glow on a screen nearby and set out to investigate the source.
Scientists have found X-rays bursting out of supernovas for the first time, an unexpected discovery that could change the way astronomers think about these space explosions.
X-rays appear to be trickling away from Pluto, even though the dwarf planet has no obvious way of making the high-energy photons, a new study reports.
com BOSSES at a crisis-hit hospital trust had 'no knowledge' of a shocking backlog of 36,000 x-rays, which had put patients at risk.
Objective: To summarize abdominal plain X-rays and ultrasound characteristics of 144 cases of Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) and to analyze diagnostic value and disease evaluation significance of abdominal ultrasound inspection for NEC.
In this study we emphasize upon the common causes of rejected/repeated chest X-rays in order to provide relevant information that would help achieve sound reduction in radiation exposure and cost as well as develop acceptable image quality.
NASA's NuSTAR mission has detected an unexpected haze of high-energy X-rays in our galaxy's crowded center.
TEHRAN (FNA)- In late 2013, when the neutron star at the heart of one of our galaxy's oddest supernovae gave off a massive burst of X-rays, the resulting echoes -- created when the X-rays bounced off clouds of dust in interstellar space -- yielded a surprising new measuring stick for astronomers.
X-RAY X-rays can be of various strengths to penetrate different organs so that a picture is shown on a photographic plate.
Screening has become more complicated with introduction of positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) which involves much higher radiation levels and injection of radio-opaque dye which increase the risk of cancer up to 20 to 30 times compared with traditional X-rays (Morales, 2013).
Between 1995 and 2009, the use of chest x-rays for children with asthma significantly increased in emergency departments overall, but dropped in pediatric emergency departments--findings that have implications for savings in health care costs and safe, according to Dr.