xenogamy


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Related to xenogamy: xenogeny, xerarch

xe·nog·a·my

 (zĭ-nŏg′ə-mē)
xe·nog′a·mous adj.

xenogamy

(zɛˈnɒɡəmɪ)
n
(Botany) botany another name for cross-fertilization
xeˈnogamous adj

xenogamy

cross-fertilization in plants or flowers.
See also: Plants
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of obligate xenogamy has also been reported in other genera of the Asteraceae, for instance, Senecio (Abbott and Irwin, 1988) and Cirsium (Michaux, 1989).
bonijesu, which is also observed in other species ofthe genus (Carauta, 1978; Berg, 2001), is a floral trait that involves the temporal separation of female and male functions in inflorescences with unisexual flowers, thereby favoring xenogamy (Lloyd & Webb, 1986; Benin & Newman, 1993).
It is a vanguard organisation type and in our case the thriving result of a xenogamy between the subsidized free-flow-of-information mother and a market driven information-as-an-economic-good father.
geitonogamy); the close spacing of the plants are likewise allowed bees to forage on numerous individuals and facilitate crosspollination (i.e., xenogamy).
xenogamy), potential pollinator identification, and germination and establishment requirements (Diamond et al., 2006; Lazaro and Traveset, 2006; Strong and Williamson, 2007; Tepedino et al., 2007; Tepedino et al., 2010; Watrous and Cane, 2011).
Furthermore, it is also noticeable the diversity of traits inherent in this genus, the species differing in longevity (therophytes to chamaephytes), flower colour (white, pink, yellow, orange) and size, flower biology (cleistogamy and chasmogamy) and breeding and mating systems (autogamy, xenogamy, self-compatibility, self-incompatibility) (Arrington & Kubitziky 2003, Rodriguez-Perez 2005).
The following tests were carried out to evaluate the breeding system: 1-Manual self-pollination (autogamy); 2-Cross-pollination (xenogamy).
Treatment 2) The flower was emasculated as above, but not bagged, so that seeds that matured would be the result of either geitonogamy (in which an ovule is fertilized by pollen from a different flower on the same plant) or xenogamy (in which the pollen is transferred from a different individual), but not intrafloral self-pollination.