xenogenesis


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xen·o·gen·e·sis

 (zĕn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, zē′nə-)
n.
The supposed production of offspring markedly different from either parent.

xen′o·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), xen′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

xenogenesis

(ˌzɛnəˈdʒɛnɪsɪs) or

xenogeny

n
1. (Biology) the supposed production of offspring completely unlike either parent
2. (Biology) another name for abiogenesis, alternation of generations
xenogenetic, ˌxenoˈgenic adj

xen•o•gen•e•sis

(ˌzɛn əˈdʒɛn ə sɪs, ˌzi nə-)

also xe•nog•e•ny

(zəˈnɒdʒ ə ni)

n.
2. the supposed generation of offspring completely and permanently different from the parent.
[1865–70]
xen`o•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) xen`o•gen′ic, adj.

xenogenesis, xenogeny

1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. — xenogenetic, xenogenic, adj.
See also: Biology
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny.xenogenic, — xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Organisms
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny. — xenogenic, xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xenogenesis - the alternation of two or more different forms in the life cycle of a plant or animal
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
digenesis, metagenesis - alternation of sexual and asexual generations
References in periodicals archive ?
"Posthuman Bodies and Agency in Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis." In Dark Horizons: Science Fiction and the Dystopian Imagination, edited by Raffaella Baccolini and Tom Moylan, 91-111.
Josue surmises this arrangement was created thousands of years ago as a means for the Qhigarians to extract DNA in their quest for information and self-improvement (not unlike the Oankali of Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy).
On display is a copy of her Xenogenesis trilogy, set after a nuclear holocaust when the few survivors - including Lilith, a black human female - have been plucked from the dying planet by the alien race Oankali who, though lacking ears, eyes or noses, have bodies covered in sensory tentacles.
"Technology, the Environment and Biopolitics in Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis." Foreign Literature Studies 36.6 (2014): 18-30.
The alien encounters in Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy (1987-89), Lessing's Canopus in Argos series (1979-1981), and Ursula Le Guin's Hainish Cycle (1967) raise issues of the construction and instability of human subjectivity and, resultantly, the potential for alternative human, or even post-human, becomings.
Thus, the frame of Afrofuturist sonic reference could extend to easily encompass the nonagenarian Egyptian composer Halitn El-Dabh, recognized as the "father of African electronic music," or AACM composer and flutist Nicole Mitchell's Xenogenesis Suite (2008), based on the work of Octa-via Butler.
Michella Erica Green in her analysis of Octavia Butler's XENOGENESIS trilogy maintains that Butler's works "border on the dystopian because she insists on confronting problems that have occurred so often in human communities that they seem almost an unavoidable part of human nature" (qtd in Jim Miller 339).
Here the alien-human congress is explored in essays on Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy, miscegenation in science fiction TV and film, colonialism in Star Trek, and preoedipal development in Primo Levi's science fiction.
(26) The ensuing essays deal with works as diverse as Cormac McCarthy's The Road, Bernard Malamud's God's Grace, Octavia Butler's Parable series and Xenogenesis Trilogy, and zombie narrative.