xenophobically

xenophobically

(ˌzɛnəˈfəʊbɪkəlɪ)
adv
(Psychology) in a xenophobic manner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"xenophobically anxious," a predicate for claims of foreigner
Strangelove (Stanley Kubrick, 1964) or its 1980s progeny such as the made-for-television The Day After (Nicholas Meyer, 1983) are uncharacteristically nihilistic but still inherently (and xenophobically) deal with the horrors of losing capitalist American culture as it exists.
Xenophobic xenophobically, Xenotropic, xeric, xerographic, xerographically.
"The result is a freewheeling joyride through genre cinema and literature: there are psychotic mafia bosses, insane motorcycle gangs, xenophobically sketched triads, corrupt secret agents and cynical movie producers - their stories twist and interconnect, slithering around the lives of our protagonists.
The contained essays point out, through selected case studies, how presidents have discussed specific immigrant groups as a positive, beneficial addition to American life while at the same time, in many contexts, repeatedly acting xenophobically and framing immigrants and the immigration process as detrimental.
Uniting people xenophobically under a perceived shared threat (disease, homosexuality), he persuaded over 2 million Californians to vote for mandatory HIV testing and quarantine.
Contrary to what he sees as the common tendency to view white southern writers of the 1930s and '40s as xenophobically turning inward and away from the debate about the threat of totalitarianism to Western democracy, Brinkmeyer argues that they were actually "turned fearfully outward, haunted by the ghostly presence of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany" (2).
On the subway, surrounded by Hasidim crouched xenophobically over their Bibles, I have to sit on my hands and bite my tongue to keep from shouting out, 'I know your story!' I don't feel loyalty as much as an irrational, childlike desire to burst their suffocating illusions of purity.
Whereas the horror films of yore would invariably depict true red-white-and-blue protagonists dealing xenophobically with foreign evil (vampires and cat people often represented all of Eastern Europe), a new wave of horror film presented terror in America as a messy, brutally honest implosion from within.
As I've suggested, "translation" would appear then to anticipate a Derridean philosopheme that would come to have more importance in his work, namely Europe's "other heading." "German romanticism," like "Europe," is foreign to itself, and in that estrangement, which is not an accident xenophobically befalling an imagined culture but the tortuous condition out of which it emerges provisionally as an identifiable "culture" in the first place, dwells the hint of another "romanticism" and of an elsewhere in "German." This romanticism, we might say, is to come, because it involves, as Derrida says hopefully of Europe, "the poetic invention of an idiom whose singularity would not yield to any nationalist, not even a European nationalism" (Rogues 158).
They had a man who could have given Blair a bloody nose - Ken Clarke - and yet they are so xenophobically riven over the idea of closer ties to Europe that, as a party, they are too stupid to choose him as their leader.