xerography


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xe·rog·ra·phy

 (zĭ-rŏg′rə-fē)
n.
A dry photographic or photocopying process in which a negative image formed by a resinous powder on an electrically charged plate is electrically transferred to and thermally fixed as positive on a paper or other copying surface.

xe·rog′ra·pher n.
xer′o·graph′ic (zîr′ə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
xer′o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

xerography

(zɪˈrɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a photocopying process in which an electrostatic image is formed on a selenium plate or cylinder. The plate or cylinder is dusted with a resinous powder, which adheres to the charged regions, and the image is then transferred to a sheet of paper on which it is fixed by heating
xeˈrographer n
xerographic adj
ˌxeroˈgraphically adv

xe•rog•ra•phy

(zɪˈrɒg rə fi)

n.
a copying process in which areas on a sheet of paper are sensitized by static electricity and then sprinkled with black or colored resin that is fused to the paper.
[1945–50]
xe•ro•graph•ic (ˌzɪər əˈgræf ɪk) adj.
xe`ro•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

xerography

a process for copying graphic matter by electrostatically charging a surface in areas corresponding to the printed areas of the original so that powdered resin carrying an opposite charge adheres to them and can be fused to the surface by pressure, heat, or both. — xerographic, adj.
See also: Copying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xerography - forming an image by the action of light on a specially coated charged plate; the latent image is developed with powders that adhere only to electrically charged areas; "edge enhancement is intrinsic in xerography"
photography, picture taking - the act of taking and printing photographs
Translations

xerography

[zɪəˈrɒgrəfɪ] Nxerografía f

xe·rog·ra·phy

n. xerografía. V.: xeroradiography
References in periodicals archive ?
When Joe Wilson committed his little Haloid Photographic Company to develop xerography, it was a big, intense project.
"The original 101 Dalmatians is famous in our eyes for the artistic style, it was the first time they came along with the process of xerography, which maintained the linework of all the drawings, so it looked like it was created and crafted by an artist.
(32.) See Hawley, "Reevaluating mimeographs." For a social analysis of the impact of Xerography on late-twentieth-century counter-cultural movements, see Kate Eichhorn, Adjusted Margin: Xerography, Art, and Activism in the Late Twentieth Century (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2016).
Caption: Catherine Jansen, Sewing Space, 1981, thread, embroidery, xerography on cloth.
Unauthorized reproduction of this newsletter or its contents by xerography, facsimile, or any other means is illegal.
At the time of its inception in the early 1940s, the printing method of the photocopier was dubbed 'xerography'.
Electrophotography, also known as xerography, is a printing technique that is used in photocopy machines, laser, and LED printers.
Gitelman demonstrates the way concepts of xerography influenced the development of digital knowledge practices through her detailed account of the Pentagon
He is co-author of Organic Photoreceptors for Imaging Systems (Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1993), Organic Photoreceptors for Xerography (Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1998) and he is co-editor of the Handbook of Imaging Materials, Second Edition (Marcel Dekker, Inc., 2002).
The term Xerox is ostensibly drawn from the technical name for the photocopying process, xerography, which itself is derived from Greek words for "dry" and "writing," [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Since the invention of Xerography more than 75 years ago, the people of Xerox (NYSE:XRX) have helped businesses simplify the way work gets done.