yardarm

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yard·arm

 (yärd′ärm′)
n. Nautical
Either end of a yard of a square sail.

yardarm

(ˈjɑːdˌɑːm)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical the two tapering outer ends of a ship's yard

yard•arm

(ˈyɑrdˌɑrm)

n.
either of the outer portions of the yard of a square sail.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yardarm - either end of the yard of a square-rigged shipyardarm - either end of the yard of a square-rigged ship
yard - a long horizontal spar tapered at the end and used to support and spread a square sail or lateen
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
Translations

yardarm

[ˈjɑːdɑːm] N (Naut) → verga f, penol m

yardarm

n (Naut) → Nock f; to hang somebody from the yardarmjdn am Mast aufknüpfen; when the sun is over the yardarm (dated inf)wenn es (endlich) soweit ist, dass man sich einen genehmigen darf (inf)

yardarm

[ˈjɑːdɑːm] n (Naut) → varea
References in periodicals archive ?
Before 1807, lanterns were slung from the yardarms of ships moored by dangerous rocks or reefs.
As the crew struggled to trim the coals to bring the ship upright, "another sea broke on board and laid her down, with the lower yardarms touching the sea, which was rolling dreadfully at the time".
Although within narrower limits, we learn language a lot like you do: babbling, imitation, re-enforcement, repetition, the whole nine yardarms. So here's the poop: my species can say anything from "Hello" and "Curse you!" to "It's a rare pleasure to cast eyes upon you once again, my dear friend," and "Why don't you stop pulling my beak, you ignorant, ugly, foul-breathed, fool!" (If my language seems temperate for my stereotypically profane species, I came up in a very proper "Kiwi" family.)
The trunks of seven large elm trees were used to make the keel of Nelson's HMS Victory and roughly 2,800 fir and spruce trees went into the decks, masts and yardarms.
Even when the vessels are out at sea in huge swells and high winds, it is still essential every crew member is capable of taking to the rigging and heading out on to the yardarms to unfurl sails, roll them back in again or straighten out knotted ropes.
borne aloft by Cupids at either extreme ends of the yardarms, and they