yellow journalism


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yellow journalism

n.
Journalism that exploits, distorts, or exaggerates the news to create sensations and attract readers.

[From the use of yellow ink in printing "Yellow Kid," a cartoon strip in the New York World, a newspaper noted for sensationalism.]

yellow journalism

n
(Journalism & Publishing) the type of journalism that relies on sensationalism and lurid exaggeration to attract readers
[C19: perhaps shortened from the phrase Yellow Kid journalism, referring to the Yellow Kid, a cartoon (1895) in the New York World, a newspaper having a reputation for sensationalism]

yellow journalism

the practice of seeking out sensational news for the purpose of boosting a newspaper’s circulation, or, if such stories are hard to find, of trying to make comparatively innocuous news appear sensational. Also called sensationalism. — yellow journalist, n.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yellow journalism - sensationalist journalism
journalism, news media - newspapers and magazines collectively
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm concerned about the rapid growth of yellow journalism that presents little or no legitimate well-researched news while instead using eye-catching headlines for increased sales or to mislead the public.
GCIS Acting Director-General, Phumla Williams, said: This story in The Star is a form of yellow journalism, which uses eye-catching headlines for increasing sales.
Yellow journalism will be eliminated from Changa Manga .
Thus was born Yellow Journalism, an adjective for unscrupulous journalism.
Cause good news is no news," says Kirk Douglas' plotting, amoral reporter in Billy Wilder's yellow journalism classic.
Among the definitions are: stories that are probably false, have enormous traction (popular appeal) in the culture and are consumed by millions of people(Michael Radutzky, a producer of CBS 60 Minutes); a type of yellow journalism or propaganda that consists of deliberate misinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional print and broadcast news media or online social media; and is invoked by politicians against the media for stories they don't like or for comments that they don't like (both from Wikipedia).
In a condolence message President Panjgur Press Club Umer Majid Baloch, Vice President Qadir Bakhsh Sanjrani, Hazoor Bakhsh Qadir, Waheed Baloch, Rafiq Chakar, Khalid Jameel and Niaz Jan Baloch said that Lala Siddiq Baluch given a new way to journalism by rejecting yellow journalism in the province and he spread the journalism in every corner of province to raise voice of people to national and international level.
In Pakistan and in many regional countries, yellow journalism has become quite a norm.
However, he added, disinformation campaign against the party chairman could not be appreciated and yellow journalism was not allowed as per the code of ethics of the media.
United Nations, Safar 4, 1439, Oct 24, 2017, SPA -- The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has regretted that the Rapporteurs of a prominent international body such as the United Nations rely on yellow journalism to be their reference in their information and reports.
Written by Antoine Lilti (Professor of History at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris) and aptly translated from French into English for an American readership by Lynn Jeffress, "The Invention of Celebrity" shows that the mechanisms of celebrity were developed in Europe during the Enlightenment, well before films, yellow journalism, and television, and then flourished during the Romantic period on both sides of the Atlantic.
In fact, looking at the history of fake news in the United States shows the rise of made-up stories and yellow journalism actually created an appetite for more objective news, and at the turn of the 20th century, modern journalism, with real reporters covering statehouses and beats, became a successful and powerful business model.