yellow journalism

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Related to Yellow press: George Dewey, Joseph Pulitzer

yellow journalism

n.
Journalism that exploits, distorts, or exaggerates the news to create sensations and attract readers.

[From the use of yellow ink in printing "Yellow Kid," a cartoon strip in the New York World, a newspaper noted for sensationalism.]

yellow journalism

n
(Journalism & Publishing) the type of journalism that relies on sensationalism and lurid exaggeration to attract readers
[C19: perhaps shortened from the phrase Yellow Kid journalism, referring to the Yellow Kid, a cartoon (1895) in the New York World, a newspaper having a reputation for sensationalism]

yellow journalism

the practice of seeking out sensational news for the purpose of boosting a newspaper’s circulation, or, if such stories are hard to find, of trying to make comparatively innocuous news appear sensational. Also called sensationalism. — yellow journalist, n.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yellow journalism - sensationalist journalism
journalism, news media - newspapers and magazines collectively
References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe the Trump opposition, regardless of the reasons, would be well advised to start focusing on his really weak points, of which there surely will be many, instead of hoping that their exaggerated nightmares and sad predictions may come true or following yellow press tactics in working against him.
Earlier, she submitted a request for a tour in Baghdad to look at the security situation there and to refute the yellow press allegations that promote violence and fighting in the capital.
The Balangiga bells have been at the center of divergent points of view-the US yellow press reporting on the so-called Balangiga Massacre, painted the Filipinos in the worst possible light.
In an interview with the "Free Lebanon" radio station, Geagea said "I cannot find any explanation for the campaign by some of those 'yellow press' and 'yellow faces', except that an attempt to mitigate the win, the size or the drive of their opponent through the dissemination of fabricated news and rumors," stressing that "he who laughs last laughs best."
There are also examples of 18th-century yellow press in New York City, "where lies and hoaxes were sold so people would buy them", said Campbell.
The yellow press in our country sees bad days for we do not cut short the hyperbolic details.
The memoir returns again and again to that wound and to thoughts of revenge against his tormentors in the 'yellow press'.
Insofar as she had any training, it was in the yellow press. It was the real fake news."
In addition to that, in the last few years, the yellow press in Germany has associated this title with an extremely flamboyant personality, thus affecting the reputation of all decent honorary consuls in Germany significantly.
(1) Given that many of these allegations proved to be wrong, German propaganda should have had a chance to counter that narrative, but Fulwider argues there was a conscious decision not to lower the tone and engage with what were perceived as yellow press methods.
Thus, shorn of the yellow press, media hype, biased poll surveys, sloganeering, and culture of denial of the Aquino administration, the candidates have obviously arrived at the conclusion that they can govern and manage the nation far better than Pres.
Journalists with yellow press cards, which are given after working for a certain period as a journalist for an established media institution, can attend any event organized by the government and use public transportation for free.