yellow-bellied sapsucker


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yellow-bellied sapsucker

n.
A woodpecker (Sphyrapicus varius) of North and Central America, having a yellowish belly and red crown and in the male a red throat.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yellow-bellied sapsucker - eastern North American sapsucker having a pale yellow abdomenyellow-bellied sapsucker - eastern North American sapsucker having a pale yellow abdomen
sapsucker - small American woodpecker that feeds on sap from e.g. apple and maple trees
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The yellow-bellied sapsucker knocks neat lines of holes in the trunks of trees, to the consternation of some gardeners, but the sap loss is minimal, and, besides, there's nothing you can do about it.
Bird watchers may encounter yellow-bellied sapsucker, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, northern flicker, pileated woodpecker, and eastern wood-pewee.
The species which were most affected within our study for this region include the American Kestrel, Black-Crowned Night-Heron, Double-Crested Cormorant, Eastern Phoebe, Hermit Thrush, Ruby-Crowned Kinglet, Savannah Sparrow, Warbling Vireo, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, the Horned Lark, and the Northern Shrike (Tables 3 and 4).
20: The Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker Moon is new at 4:36 a.m.
During one count Strycker saw a yellow-bellied sapsucker, not common in these parts.
The yellow-bellied sapsucker ranges throughout the eastern half of the United States and most of Canada.
However, no studies have simultaneously combined Yellow-bellied Sapsucker habitat use and host tree selection with host tree morphology and physiology, particularly in the southwestern portion of its U.S.
Shigo (1963) found a correlation between the scars and decay resulting from yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) damage and the occurrence of ring shake.
Whether you're a literary historian in search of the past, an artist in search of a muse, or a bird aficionado in search of a yellow-bellied sapsucker, two new books are must-have guides for planning the perfect nature getaway..
1903-22 1965-87 Species (20) (23) Difference Killdeer 3-01 (20) 2-21 (21) -8 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3-26 (20) 3-29 (21) +3 Eastern Phoebe 3-17 (18) 3-22 (22) +5 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3-28 (20) 4-07 (22) +10 Eastern Bluebird 2-23 (17) 2-24 (22) +1 Hermit Thrush 3-31 (18) 4-08 (21) +8 Brown Thrasher 3-27 (19) 3-25 (22) -2 Eastern Towhee 3-11 (20) 3-14 (22) +3 Chipping Sparrow 3-23 (20) 4-04 (20) +12 Field Sparrow 3-22 (20) 3-17 (22) -5 Vesper Sparrow 3-28 (19) 4-03 (20) +6 Fox Sparrow 3-01 (20) 3-11 (21) +10 Swamp Sparrow 3-19 (20) 3-22 (20) +3 Red-winged Blackbird 3-06 (19) 2-20 (22) -14 Eastern Meadowlark 2-26 (20) 2-13 (17) -13 Rusty Blackbird 3-08 (19) 3-02 (16) -6 Brown-headed Cowbird 3-11 (19) 3-11 (21) +0 Table 2.
Another critter that is pesky but usually not lethal is the yellow-bellied sapsucker. This woodpecker relative will drill, chisel, or peck a horizontal line of holes in the bark about 1/8 of an inch deep and one inch apart to suck up some sap.
The last woodpecker species to call New York home is the yellow-bellied sapsucker (pictured on page 23).