yellowfin

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yellowfin

(ˈjɛləʊˌfɪn)
n
(Animals) a large type of tuna, Thunnus albacares, having yellow fins
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yellowfin - may reach 400 poundsyellowfin - may reach 400 pounds; worldwide in tropics
genus Thunnus, Thunnus - tunas: warm-blooded fishes
tunny, tuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
References in periodicals archive ?
He had a 33 Dusky at his house and was planning another one of these crazy loops through the Bahamas in search of yellowfins. He'd run Northwest Channel out to the open Atlantic, up around Elbow Cay, back around north of the Abacos, stopping at strategic points to unwind.
Running the charterboat Predator out of Port Canaveral in 1987, Dwyer made it to the 120-mile NOAA weather buoy to discover it was mobbed by yellowfins. Within a few years, Dwyer figured out how to find seabirds using radar, which at once expanded the playing field while at the same time shortening the runs.
in Knoxville, Tennessee, began releasing yellowfins into the Tellico River, Tennessee.
The numerous blackfin will keep you busy between the bruiser yellowfins. Not every rig will hold tuna.
For the next three months parties will be making regular runs out of the three inlets as the yellowfins continue to be reliable through the summer.
I can still remember pulling the Dos Amigos into Walkers Cay with her boxes full of yellowfins up to 110 pounds, only to learn ice was $1.00 per pound.
But visually confirming large tunas busting on the surface is a surefire way to have a solid chance at catching nice yellowfins.
Upon locating a flock of birds that appear to be shadowing yellowfins, there are many techniques you might deploy.
People catch yellowfin tuna year-round in that stretch of water, north of Matanilla Reef, and east almost to Walkers Cay (See "Strike Zone for Yellowfins" on p.
Commercial pressure, fickle currents, and catastrophes of our own making (oil spills) may conspire to keep those fat yellowfins tantalizingly out of reach--and the mighty bluefin skidding toward extinction.
"It appears the yellowfin that come up The Bahamas and run north are migrating from West Africa, swimming on the currents on the east side of the Caribbean, which is the same current that brings the marlin in," Roffer says.
I'm sure killer whales could be feeding on whatever they want, but my guess is they had been feeding on yellowfin tuna.