yielding

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yield·ing

 (yēl′dĭng)
adj.
Inclined to give way to pressure, argument, or influence; docile.

yield′ing·ly adv.
yield′ing·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

yielding

(ˈjiːldɪŋ)
adj
1. compliant, submissive, or flexible
2. pliable or soft: a yielding material.
ˈyieldingly adv
ˈyieldingness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

yield•ing

(ˈyil dɪŋ)

adj.
1. submissive; compliant.
2. tending to give way, esp. under pressure; flexible.
3. (of a crop, soil, etc.) producing a yield; productive.
[1300–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yielding - a verbal act of admitting defeatyielding - a verbal act of admitting defeat  
relinquishing, relinquishment - a verbal act of renouncing a claim or right or position etc.
2.yielding - the act of conceding or yielding
assent, acquiescence - agreement with a statement or proposal to do something; "he gave his assent eagerly"; "a murmur of acquiescence from the assembly"
bye, pass - you advance to the next round in a tournament without playing an opponent; "he had a bye in the first round"
Adj.1.yielding - inclined to yield to argument or influence or control; "a timid yielding person"
docile - willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed; "the docile masses of an enslaved nation"
2.yielding - lacking stiffness and giving way to pressure; "a deep yielding layer of foam rubber"
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
3.yielding - tending to give in or surrender or agree; "too yielding to make a stand against any encroachments"- V.I.Parrington
compromising, conciliatory, flexible - making or willing to make concessions; "loneliness tore through him...whenever he thought of...even the compromising Louis du Tillet"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

yielding

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

yielding

adjective
Yielding easily to pressure or weight; not firm:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

yielding

[ˈjiːldɪŋ] ADJ
1. (= soft) [ground, surface, substance] → flexible, blando
2. (= compliant, submissive) [person] (in temperament) → complaciente; (physically) → tierno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

yielding

adj personnachgiebig; surface, materialnachgebend; the ground is yieldingder Boden gibt nach
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

yielding

[ˈjiːldɪŋ] adj (person) → arrendevole; (ground, surface) → cedevole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Even those playing cards behind the partition soon left their game and came over to the samovar, yielding to the general mood of courting Mary Hendrikhovna.
He left the house, the door yielding easily to his hand, and walked to the Commercial office.
Yielding to this conviction, the worthy chaplain begged the governor to have the clothes in which the licentiate had entered the house given to him.
According to these highly-respectable witnesses, the minister, conscious that he was dying -- conscious, also, that the reverence of the multitude placed him already among saints and angels -- had desired, by yielding up his breath in the arms of that fallen woman, to express to the world how utterly nugatory is the choicest of man's own righteousness.
My candle, under a bold flourish, went out, and I perceived, by the uncovered window, that the yielding dusk of earliest morning rendered it unnecessary.
Minerva, wondering why they had preferred trees not yielding fruit, inquired the reason for their choice.
de Chevreuse, who told it to two or three of her intimates, that, yielding to his vocation, he had retired into a convent--only into which, nobody knew.
And, besides, your modern ship which is a steamship makes her passages on other principles than yielding to the weather and humouring the sea.